Question about centripetal motion problem

In summary, the problem involves a biker going 20 m/s on a frictionless, circular track of radius 12m banked at an angle of theta degrees. The mass is not a factor. The solution involves finding the horizontal and vertical components of the forces of gravity and the normal force and ensuring that they add up to the correct sum. This can be done by using the equation tan(theta)= Vy/Vx.
  • #1
Hey I am confused about how to find theta in this problem:

A biker going 20 m/s on a frictionless, circular track of radius 12m banked at an angle of theta degrees

I started by just finding the accel... v^2/r = 400/12 = 33.333

the mass does not matter because it cancels out so...

then I just don't know what to do

any info helps
thanks
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
i think it has to do with seperating the Vx and Vy and get tan(theta)= Vy/Vx

the Vx and Vy are maybe the centip accel and grav?

idk

thanks
 
  • #3
frostyman202 said:
i think it has to do with seperating the Vx and Vy and get tan(theta)= Vy/Vx

the Vx and Vy are maybe the centip accel and grav?

idk

thanks
You have the right idea. The only forces acting are gravity and the normal force. Their vector sum has to be horizontal and equal to the centripetal force. Resolve these two forces into horizontal and vertical components as you suggest, and demand that the components lead to the correct sum.
 

1. What is centripetal motion?

Centripetal motion is the movement of an object in a circular path, with a constant inward force acting towards the center of the circle.

2. What are some examples of centripetal motion?

Common examples of centripetal motion include the motion of planets around the sun, a car driving around a curved track, and a ball attached to a string being swung in a circle.

3. How is centripetal force related to centripetal motion?

Centripetal force is the inward force that keeps an object moving in a circular path. It is directly proportional to the mass of the object, the square of its velocity, and inversely proportional to the radius of the circle.

4. What is the difference between centripetal force and centrifugal force?

Centripetal force is the inward force that keeps an object moving in a circular path, while centrifugal force is the outward force that appears to act on an object moving in a circular path. However, centrifugal force is actually a perceived force and not a true physical force.

5. How can I calculate the centripetal force of an object?

The formula for calculating centripetal force is Fc = mv^2/r, where Fc is the centripetal force, m is the mass of the object, v is its velocity, and r is the radius of the circle. Alternatively, you can also use the formula Fc = 4π^2mr/T^2, where T is the period of the motion.

Suggested for: Question about centripetal motion problem

Replies
16
Views
498
Replies
5
Views
676
Replies
13
Views
134
Replies
1
Views
347
Replies
1
Views
929
Replies
11
Views
2K
Back
Top