Question about the nature of Gravitation

In summary, the conversation discussed two different ways of explaining gravitation: the General Theory of Relativity and Quantum Field Theory. While the former sees it as an effect of the curvature of space-time, the latter proposes the existence of a hypothetical particle called the graviton. When asked if gravitation obeys wave-particle duality, it was clarified that while gravitons would obey this duality, gravitation as a force does not. The conversation also mentioned a paper that explains this duality in more detail.
  • #1
Hello.

Modern Physics explains Gravitation in two general ways:
  • In accordance to the General Theory of Relativity, Gravitation is thought of as an effect of the curvature of space-time continuum. This results in the formation of the recently and famously detected Gravitational Waves.
  • Quantum Field Theory explains Gravitation to be mediated by a hypothetical particle called the graviton.
So can we say that even Gravitation obeys wave particle duality? Please express your views.

Thanks!

Swapnil
 
Space news on Phys.org
  • #2
Swapnil Das said:
So can we say that even Gravitation obeys wave particle duality?

No. Gravitation is like the electric force. An electron or photon obeys the wave-particle duality, but the electric force does not. Gravitons, if they exist, would obey the same duality, but gravitation would not.
 
  • Like
Likes Swapnil Das
  • #3
Drakkith said:
No. Gravitation is like the electric force. An electron or photon obeys the wave-particle duality, but the electric force does not. Gravitons, if they exist, would obey the same duality, but gravitation would not.
Thanks for your valuable reply!
 
  • #4
The wave-particle duality is a property of a wavefunction, not of a force. A graviton is a perturbation of a vacuum and has a certain wavefunction in the quantum formalism. Hence it will obey the wave-particle duality.

Btw, see chapter 2 of this paper,

http://arxiv.org/pdf/quant-ph/0609163.pdf

by one of our PF-users, for a clear explanation of the duality.
 
  • #5
Gravitons have not been detected, although if they were that would certainly upset a few apple carts.
 

What is gravitation?

Gravitation is the natural phenomenon by which physical objects with mass are attracted to one another. It is governed by the laws of physics, specifically Newton's law of universal gravitation and Einstein's theory of general relativity.

What causes gravitation?

Gravitation is caused by the curvature of spacetime, which is influenced by the distribution of mass and energy. This curvature creates a force that pulls objects towards each other.

Why is gravitation important?

Gravitation is important because it is responsible for many large-scale phenomena in the universe, such as the motion of planets and stars, the formation of galaxies, and the expansion of the universe. It also plays a crucial role in our daily lives, as it keeps us grounded on Earth and allows us to use objects like tools and vehicles.

How is gravitation measured?

Gravitation is measured using the gravitational constant, G, which is a fundamental constant of nature. The strength of the gravitational force between two objects is directly proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them.

Can gravitation be manipulated or controlled?

Currently, there is no known way to manipulate or control gravitation. However, scientists are constantly researching and studying this phenomenon in hopes of understanding it better and potentially finding ways to harness its power for practical purposes in the future.

Suggested for: Question about the nature of Gravitation

Replies
14
Views
2K
Replies
24
Views
3K
Replies
9
Views
1K
Replies
5
Views
970
Replies
7
Views
237
Replies
5
Views
1K
Back
Top