Quick question on single displacements?

  • Thread starter Theorγ
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In summary, there is a possible reaction between hydrogen gas and hot iron (II) oxide powder. The first equation suggests no reaction due to the lower activity of H2, but the second equation contradicts this as Fe is more active. The third equation only occurs in acidic, aqueous solution and the reaction may be spontaneous at high temperatures. However, the problem mentions "hot iron (II) oxide" which may indicate that the reaction does occur. Additionally, the removal of produced water through the gas stream shifts the equilibrium to the right.
  • #1
Theorγ
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Hydrogen gas is passed over hot iron (II) oxide powder.

My initial answer was that there was going to be no reaction because of the fact that H2 is less active than Fe:

[tex]H_{2} + FeO \rightarrow No Reaction[/tex]

Then, I looked over the web to find the answer to this but encountered two different ones. The first one complies with the rule for the activity series. However, I found this answer to be contradicting with mines since Fe is more active than H2:

[tex]H_{2} + FeO \rightarrow Fe + H_{2}O[/tex]

The other answer I found was the following, which I have no idea how they got:

[tex]H_{2} + FeO \rightarrow Fe + H_{3}O^{+}[/tex]

Which of these equations is the the right one for the problem?
 
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  • #2
The third reaction is only going to occur in acidic, aqueous solution (since it's the hydronium ion), so that's not going to happen here.

I would calculate deltaG for this reaction to see if it's spontaneous. The entropy term,
[tex]T \Delta S[/tex]
has a temperature dependence, so above a certain temperature, the reaction may be spontaneous.

However, since the problem specifies "hot iron (II) oxide," my hunch would be that the reaction does occur.
 
  • #3
Note that you are removing produced water - it is being taken out by the gas stream. That shifts equilibrium to the right.
 

1. What is a single displacement reaction?

A single displacement reaction is a type of chemical reaction in which one element replaces another element in a compound. This results in a new compound and a different element being formed.

2. How do you predict the products of a single displacement reaction?

The products of a single displacement reaction can be predicted using the activity series, which lists elements in order of their reactivity. The more reactive element will replace the less reactive element in the compound.

3. What is an example of a single displacement reaction?

An example of a single displacement reaction is the reaction between zinc (Zn) and hydrochloric acid (HCl) to form zinc chloride (ZnCl2) and hydrogen gas (H2).

4. Is a single displacement reaction reversible?

Yes, a single displacement reaction can be reversible if the products are able to recombine to form the original reactants. However, some single displacement reactions are irreversible if the products are stable and unable to react again.

5. How is a single displacement reaction different from a double displacement reaction?

A single displacement reaction involves the replacement of one element in a compound, while a double displacement reaction involves the exchange of elements between two compounds. In a single displacement reaction, only one new compound is formed, while in a double displacement reaction, two new compounds are formed.

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