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Physics RE: physics and Aeronautical science/aerospace

  1. Dec 15, 2008 #1
    Hi I would like to know wether a degree and phD will help me get an appropriate job for the above fields. Although they are related to physics but i am looking forward to do Astrophysics as an extra module. will this help me get into the required field and whatr is the average payment a person gets in this.




    Please help!
    Varun
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 15, 2008 #2

    Choppy

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    The level of education you need will depend on exactly what it is you want to do. A degree in engineering will likely allow you to work as an engineer in the aerospace industry. A degree in physics won't generally qualify you for an engineering position, but it keeps more doors open than many people would have you believe. However, if you're interested in doing research, you really need to get a graduate degree.

    Astrophysics isn't just something you pick up as an extra module. To get into this field the best approach is to do a physics degree that allows you to specialize towards your senior year by offering courses in general relativity, stellar evolution, astronomy, cosmology etc. Then you pursue graduate studies in the field. From my understanding, it's highly competative.
     
  4. Dec 15, 2008 #3
    Hi again,
    I was just thinking about what sort of job best fit astrophysics, what i mean is what sort of job will I get if I go forward with astrophysics and what sort of jobs are available in research. Basically I was planning to carry out reseach on space shuttles, satellites verifying various planets and behaviour of stars and nebulae. It sounds a bit odd but that=s what going in my mind right now.

    Choppy thanks for your reply it was really helpful

    Varun
     
  5. Dec 17, 2008 #4

    djeitnstine

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    Hey choppy I have a question related to that level of education part...what position would a masters degree put me as opposed to a bachelor's? Is it simply better or should I be looking at something specific to do such as research...more specifically Im looking at MS in Aerospace Engineering and a Masters in Aerospace Engineering.
     
  6. Dec 17, 2008 #5

    Choppy

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    Please keep in mind that I'm not an aerospace engineer.

    In general, an M.Sc. gives you more specialized skills. You will likely have some research and development experience and/or advanced coursework that people with a bachelor level education won't have. On the "pro" side, this makes you more desireable as an employee and thus able to negotiate a higher salary. On the "con" side, more specialization generally means less overall employment opportunities as you run the risk of being overqualified for some positions.

    Fortunately you don't need to make this kind of decision until your last year or so of undergrad. Do the bachelor's degree, and by your third year, you'll have a pretty good idea of what the field is really like, what research opportunities are available, and whether or not you'll want to pursue graduate work.
     
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