Reducing Uncertainty in an Experiment to 0.012 s

  • Thread starter bocobuff
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Uncertainty
In summary, the speaker wants to decrease the uncertainty of an experiment from 0.03 s to 0.012 s by performing more measurements. They are unsure of how to apply the factor of 0.012/0.03 and are seeking suggestions on how to improve the measurement that introduces the most amount of error. The speaker also mentions using the ratio of 0.03/0.012 and multiplying it by the current number of measurements to achieve the desired uncertainty. Additionally, they suggest using a laser sensor to decrease the error introduced from the beginning.
  • #1
bocobuff
42
0

Homework Statement


I want to lower the uncertainty of an experiment to 0.012 s from 0.03 s by performing x number of more measurements. I already have the mean, std dev, variance.

I know I need the factor of 0.012/0.03 somehow but I don't know where to apply it.
Any suggestions?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Identify the measurement that introduces the most amount of error and explore a way for improving that. I think it does little good to reduce uncertainty of quantities you already know with sufficient precision.
 
  • #3
That's not really what i was asking...
So say I already took N=7 measurements and have the best estimated uncertainty for the mean time, which is 0.03.
Now I want to reduce that number to 0.012 by taking some new number of measurements.
Wouldn't I just use the ratio 0.03/0.012 = 2.5 and then multiply that by 7?
So I would need to take 17.5, or 18, measurements to reduce my uncertainty to 0.012...?
 
  • #4
If it is something like timing something, then yes you can increase the number of oscillations say linearly as you suggest.

If your original modeling for the error took 200 ms as your stop watch reaction time and you want to achieve a 12 ms error, then figure that 17 oscillations will afford you that precision.

However you can also consider getting a laser sensor that attacks the problem with the notion that the error introduced is smaller to begin with.
 

Related to Reducing Uncertainty in an Experiment to 0.012 s

1. How can reducing uncertainty in an experiment to 0.012 s improve the accuracy of results?

By reducing the uncertainty in an experiment to 0.012 s, any potential errors or variations in the data are minimized, resulting in more precise and reliable results. This can help to improve the overall accuracy of the experiment.

2. What techniques can be used to reduce uncertainty in an experiment to 0.012 s?

Some techniques that can be used to reduce uncertainty in an experiment to 0.012 s include increasing the sample size, using more precise measuring instruments, and controlling external variables that may impact the results.

3. Is it possible to completely eliminate uncertainty in an experiment?

No, it is not possible to completely eliminate uncertainty in an experiment. There will always be a margin of error and some level of uncertainty, but by reducing it to 0.012 s, the impact of uncertainty on the results can be significantly minimized.

4. How does reducing uncertainty in an experiment to 0.012 s impact the reliability of the results?

Reducing uncertainty in an experiment to 0.012 s can greatly improve the reliability of the results. With less uncertainty, the results are more consistent and repeatable, making them more reliable for drawing conclusions and making decisions.

5. Are there any limitations to reducing uncertainty in an experiment to 0.012 s?

Yes, there are limitations to reducing uncertainty in an experiment to 0.012 s. It may not always be feasible or practical to reduce uncertainty to such a small value, depending on the nature of the experiment and the available resources. Additionally, some variables may be inherently unpredictable, making it difficult to reduce uncertainty to 0.012 s.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
377
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
15
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
3K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
3K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
9
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
14
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
6
Views
591
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
3K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
4K
Back
Top