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Relative motion/Projectile motion

  • Thread starter Physics345
  • Start date
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1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
Describe three ways that understanding projectile motion and relative velocity could help you improve your success in a basketball game

2. Relevant equations
none

3. The attempt at a solution
1: Understanding projectile motion and relative velocity helps a basketball player to choose what Initial velocity and angle to increase the likely hood to score a basket, whether it's a 2 point shot, a shot from downtown to score a 3, or a free throw. When the basketball player shoots a ball he can determine how much force he needs to apply depending on if he’s moving or not, if he’s moving he should take a shot while taking into account how fast he’s moving since the ball will travel with his velocity and the applied force.


2: If a basketball player decides that he wants to pass the ball to another player that is across the court, while he is at the opposite end he would need to maximize the distance he would need to throw it. In order to that he would need to pass the ball at a 45 degree angle to maximize the projectile motion at a certain initial velocity.


3: Let’s say the basketball player wanted to pass the ball at a maximum velocity to another player by understanding relative velocity he would know he needs to pass the ball while he’s moving at maximum speed and at a relative angle to the player to increase the speed of the pass since his movement speed and the balls initial velocity when he passes it are combined it would maximize the speed the ball is passed.

Thanks for taking your time to help out!
 
Last edited:

berkeman

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Good work. :smile:

Couple of comments:

On -1- you might want to say "score a basket" instead of "score a point". Baskets can count for 1, 2 or 3 points, depending on the situation.

On -2- you usually would not pass a ball by throwing it at a 45 degree angle, since that would expose the pass to being intercepted by the defense. Passes are usually lower than that to minimize the time that the ball is exposed in the air. Maybe do a little reading about the "optimum angle for a basketball shot" to see if you could use that instead in your essay.
 
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Good work. :smile:

Couple of comments:

On -1- you might want to say "score a basket" instead of "score a point". Baskets can count for 1, 2 or 3 points, depending on the situation.

On -2- you usually would not pass a ball by throwing it at a 45 degree angle, since that would expose the pass to being intercepted by the defense. Passes are usually lower than that to minimize the time that the ball is exposed in the air. Maybe do a little reading about the "optimum angle for a basketball shot" to see if you could use that instead in your essay.
Awesome advice! I'll do that for -2- and re post my answer. Is that all for -1- and is 3 a reasonable answer? I can't stand losing marks due to bad wording and lack of knowledge on a subject! (in this case it's physics and basketball) I don't care for basket ball, but I sure do love physics!
 

berkeman

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In -1-
if he’s moving he should take a shot while taking into account how fast he’s moving since the ball will travel with his velocity and the applied force.
You might re-word it a bit at the end. You don't want to mix different quantities -- think mathematically. Force and velocity don't have the same units. You could say something like the ball will travel with his velocity plus the extra velocity he imparts on it with the force from his arm. Or something like that.

Otherwise, -1- and -3- look fine to me. Other posters may have further comments, though.
 
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In -1-

You might re-word it a bit at the end. You don't want to mix different quantities -- think mathematically. Force and velocity don't have the same units. You could say something like the ball will travel with his velocity plus the extra velocity he imparts on it with the force from his arm. Or something like that.

Otherwise, -1- and -3- look fine to me. Other posters may have further comments, though.
2: If a basketball player decides that he wants to pass the ball to his teammate, but another player is blocking his trajectory directly to the other player that is wide open, he could pass the ball at an angle with just enough initial velocity to reach his teammate despite his obstacle, or he could also do the same thing but over the defenders head at a precise angle so it goes into a steep projectile motion making it much harder to intercept, but all this takes into account how vast your knowledge in projectile motion and relative velocity extend once again proving how beneficial the knowledge of these two can be to a basket ball player.

If he's moving he should take a shot while taking into account how fast he's moving, since the ball will travel with his velocity plus the relative velocity of the amount of strength he applies to the ball.

I feel like 2 is much better now, and I reworded the part you suggested. What do you think Mentor do I get an approval?
 

berkeman

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2: If a basketball player decides that he wants to pass the ball to his teammate, but another player is blocking his trajectory directly to the other player that is wide open, he could pass the ball at an angle with just enough initial velocity to reach his teammate despite his obstacle, or he could also do the same thing but over the defenders head at a precise angle so it goes into a steep projectile motion making it much harder to intercept, but all this takes into account how vast your knowledge in projectile motion and relative velocity extend once again proving how beneficial the knowledge of these two can be to a basket ball player.
TBH, I'm not understanding -2- now. I play a lot of basketball, and it kind of doesn't make sense to me.

BTW, I googled Optimum Angle for a Basketball Shot, and got to this interesting page: https://secretsofshooting.com/physics-based-basketball-shooting/

Maybe have a read through that information, to see if it helps you to come up with a new -2- :smile:
 
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TBH, I'm not understanding -2- now. I play a lot of basketball, and it kind of doesn't make sense to me.

BTW, I googled Optimum Angle for a Basketball Shot, and got to this interesting page: https://secretsofshooting.com/physics-based-basketball-shooting/

Maybe have a read through that information, to see if it helps you to come up with a new -2- :smile:
Thank's for taking your time to look that up for me, I'm going to read it now ill come back with a new answer shortly.
 

berkeman

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BTW, I just read that whole page, and his view of the best freethrow shot technique is not necessarily universal. It's not bad, and may give you a nice new -2-, but you could also re-do the Google search that I did to see if you can find better pages...
 
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BTW, I just read that whole page, and his view of the best freethrow shot technique is not necessarily universal. It's not bad, and may give you a nice new -2-, but you could also re-do the Google search that I did to see if you can find better pages...
http://ffden-2.phys.uaf.edu/webproj/212_spring_2015/Tyler_Compton/13427931675535db809aae3/the-basketball-shot.html
This one is from an authoritative source I'm going to make a new -2- out of it, hopefully this time I'll get it right =)
 

berkeman

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Nice! Kind of makes you want to go out and shoot some freethrows, eh? :biggrin:
 
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Physics is my obsession at the moment! Physics or nothing is my new motto sir! Physics is fun learning is great, it's just taking me a while to understand some of the concepts I probably need to watch some videos, but I'm working on the answer just working around some other questions in another thread at the same time I'm pretty sure I just came to a realization!

Edit: I need some type of force to wake me up, caffeine should do it and a snack, I'll be right back with energy and the correct answer!
 
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Nice! Kind of makes you want to go out and shoot some freethrows, eh? :biggrin:
If a basketball player decides that he wants to maximize his 3 point shot he would need to shoot the ball at a and angle between 45 and 48 degrees with the correct amount of force that would allow the ball to have a launch speed of around 18 miles per hour going directly to the basket from the three point line. If the basketball player wants to go even further out he would have to adjust the force applied accordingly and in turn will allow the ball to reach the basket at a relative speed proportional to the force applied with the most accuracy possible.

What do you think, it kind of feels like my first answer.
 

berkeman

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Yeah, so far it's a lot like -1-. You might use the point from the first link about trying to minimize the ball speed as it reaches the hoop on freethrows. That's an interesting theme, and you could say what launch angle seems to give this result.
 
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TBH, I'm not understanding -2- now. I play a lot of basketball, and it kind of doesn't make sense to me.

BTW, I googled Optimum Angle for a Basketball Shot, and got to this interesting page: https://secretsofshooting.com/physics-based-basketball-shooting/

Maybe have a read through that information, to see if it helps you to come up with a new -2- :smile:
Who knew basket ball could be so complicated! by the way I noticed you liked my other thread, does that mean it's correct?
 

berkeman

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A basketball player can choose to shoot at a higher arc with a deeper understanding of relative velocity projectile motion by knowing that a greater force is needed at a higher angle for the ball to reach the basket, but also taking into account the fact that the ball will be sped up on its descent towards the basket by gravity. By taking all these things into account and applying them, it could vastly improve a basket balls game, considering it is much harder to block a higher arced shot than a regular shot.

I think we got it this time Mentor!
 

berkeman

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A basketball player can choose to shoot at a higher arc with a deeper understanding of relative velocity projectile motion by knowing that a greater force is needed at a higher angle for the ball to reach the basket, but also taking into account the fact that the ball will be sped up on its descent towards the basket by gravity. By taking all these things into account and applying them, it could vastly improve a basketball player's game, considering it is much harder to block a higher arced shot than a regular shot.

I think we got it this time Mentor!
I made a small edit.

Consider posting the two links that you used in your reading. That will show the instructor that you have been doing some research... :smile:
 
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Perfect, that was the plan I always try and post my references, to avoid any accusation of plagiarism. I really appreciate it!
 

PhanthomJay

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This is all very good , but in reality, I seriously doubt a basketball player uses physics when shooting or passing etc. it's all gained from experience and becomes instinctive. No way does he or she figure out what force should be applied to accelerate the ball to the required initial velocity at a precise angle, while factoring in air resistance. They just shoot and score ( or miss ).
 

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