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Required Level of Physics/Engineering Knowledge?

  1. Jan 3, 2017 #1
    I'm trained in energy policy, not physics or engineering. How much physics and engineering knowledge do you need to know on this site?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 3, 2017 #2

    russ_watters

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    Zero, give or take.
     
  4. Jan 3, 2017 #3

    phinds

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    None, as long as you don't post personal theories. As long as you're asking questions based on actual science, you'll be fine.
     
  5. Jan 3, 2017 #4

    micromass

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    Need to know for what goal? There are members on this site with no formal physics training at all, while others have a PhD in it.
     
  6. Jan 3, 2017 #5

    phion

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    As far as I know, you may need a degree in a topic such as electrical engineering. A sub-discipline like power systems might help quite a bit in understanding "energy policy".
     
  7. Jan 3, 2017 #6

    Evo

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    You need no knowledge to read the posts. But please think twice before you post, how educated are you on what you are posting? What value will your post add to the discussion? Even if you have a question, you should have links to the source of where your question came from. You might want to spend a bit of time reading threads first to see how posting is done. :smile:
     
  8. Jan 3, 2017 #7

    phinds

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    Yes, it would very likely be QUITE helpful for his profession, but that wasn't the question. He asked what he needs to know to join the forum and that does not require what you specify.
     
  9. Jan 3, 2017 #8

    phion

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    In any meaningful sense, a professional would likely discern the difference quite quickly. I am merely inserting this advice as a student of electrical engineering.
     
  10. Jan 3, 2017 #9
    Energy policy is actually its own field. It focuses more on the economic, environmental, regulatory, national security, etc. factors of energy than the science and engineering though.
     
  11. Jan 3, 2017 #10

    Evo

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    Post if you feel you have a good knowledge of the subject being discussed. Always back up what you post with the sources for that information so that we can all see what you are referencing.

    As long as you ask, if you are not sure, or don't push something if it's been pointed out to be wrong, you'll be fine. Don't worry. Don't be afraid to say that you don't know and just want a clarification.

    Just stay within the guidelines, they are pretty lax. :smile:
     
  12. Jan 4, 2017 #11
    How can you be any kind of commentator on energy without having SOME physics training ? Most of the energy and environment degrees have a solid amount of physics from modules that contain topics like thermodynamics, heat and mass transfer, optics mechanics etc
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2017
  13. Jan 4, 2017 #12
    Specific knowledge of a science is not needed. Just a clear understanding of what the scientific method and the difference between peer reviewed and non-peer reviewed sources.

    “The wind kills all your birds. All your birds, killed. You know, the environmentalists never talk about that.” - PEOTUS. You don't happen to work for this man do you? He could use some real science in his energy policy.
     
  14. Jan 4, 2017 #13

    sorry, dont mean to be rude, I know zero physics. :sorry: I think OP knows more physics than he realises.
     
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