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Requiring guidance for Undergraduate application

  1. Feb 27, 2012 #1
    Hi there, I am currently a secondary school student in the south east of England, and I wish to become a Physicist or Astro-Physicist somewhere along the line in my wonderous future... *hint of sarcasm for wonderous*

    Anyway, I think for my Physics exams at GCSE level I would acquire a B, and at A-Level I would also acquire a B, I wish to know, If I have this GCSE and A-Level grade at B, would it be possible for some Universities to accept me for a Undergraduate Physics course? - Because I know the work is substantial and VERY hard, and I would have to try my hardest, but I know that I have exams coming up soon and I have to revise very hard up until them, But I wish to know from those that have already got to that stage, would it be possible for me to apply to a University physics course with A-Level grade of Physics at B and maybe, Mathematics at A(or B) - Because I am better at mathematics than I am at physics, but I think physics or more real-worldly, in these terms. (also another A level at B/C grade) - I don't expect anything like UCL or Imperial College, but somewhere with decent physics teaching standards.

    Thank you for reading my question, I hope someone can help me ASAP -
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 28, 2012 #2
    It's good to think ahead but I believe you're thinking about the wrong thing here. Finish your GCSEs. Work hard during your AS year in the appropriate subjects (i.e, mathematics, physics and perhaps further maths if you're up for it) and then choose where you want to go, depending on the grades you have. Don't try to estimate your grades now. It's not much use. A-Level physics is different. :-)
     
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