Review Q #4 (Motion in Two/Three Dimensions)

In summary, the spacecraft speeds up by 0.5 m/sec due to the pressure of sunlight pushing against the sail.
  • #1
TeenieWeenie
30
0

Homework Statement


The "Solar Sail I" experimental spacecraft is launched from the international space station with an initial velocity of 12 m/sec in a direction that makes a 120 angle with respect to the direction of radiation coming from the sun. Measurements show that an acceleration of 0.5 m/sec is imparted to the spacecraft by the pressure of sunlight pushing against its soar sail. Calculate the time taken for the spacecraft speed to increase 100 m/sec.

Homework Equations


Vx = VoCosAo
Vy = VoSinAo - gt


The Attempt at a Solution


I don't get what direction the radiation is coming in, no idea where to start?
 
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  • #2
TeenieWeenie said:

The "Solar Sail I" experimental spacecraft is launched from the international space station with an initial velocity of 12 m/sec in a direction that makes a 120 angle with respect to the direction of radiation coming from the sun.

The Attempt at a Solution


I don't get what direction the radiation is coming in, no idea where to start?


Read the problem text again and make a figure.
 
  • #3
If I set the direction of the spacecraft along the x-axis in the west direction, would that mean the angle is 30 degrees north of west which would result in a 120 degree angle for the sun?
 
  • #4
It looks OK.


ehild
 
  • #5
I think I'm supposed to use the relative velocity formulas?
bolded = vector
VP|A=VP|B+VB|A ?

This is probably the hardest one for me to comprehend :(
 
  • #6
I think that the velocity of the spacecraft is given with respect to the Space Station which is considered an inertia system. You have a specific direction: that of the Sun. The Sun is very far away so its rays can be considered parallel, as shown in the attachment. The motion of the spacecraft is like that of a projectile. I hope the problem was meant in this way but I may be wrong.

ehild
 

Attachments

  • spacecraft.JPG
    spacecraft.JPG
    6.1 KB · Views: 389
  • #7
That's the way I was picturing it.
Is it similar to a plane flying in crosswind?
That's the only thing I can think of :X which is in the relative velocity section.
The example/figure/diagrams also look similar.
I'm not too strong in the relative velocity section :(

Can anyone give some more input on this? This is the last problem I need to understand :)
 
  • #8
Do not worry about relative velocity. You are given the initial velocity and the acceleration. The initial velocity has both horizontal and vertical (or westward and northward) components the acceleration is horizontal (westward)ehild
 
  • #9
So which angle would I use for the formulas?
60 degrees ? or the entire 120 degrees?
 
  • #10
Do according to the picture. As you need the magnitude of the components, use 60 degree.
 

Related to Review Q #4 (Motion in Two/Three Dimensions)

What is "Motion in Two/Three Dimensions"?

"Motion in Two/Three Dimensions" refers to the study of movement in two or three-dimensional space, which includes both linear and curved motion.

What are the key concepts in "Motion in Two/Three Dimensions"?

The key concepts in "Motion in Two/Three Dimensions" include position, velocity, acceleration, displacement, and time. These concepts are used to describe the motion of an object in two or three-dimensional space.

How is "Motion in Two/Three Dimensions" different from one-dimensional motion?

"Motion in Two/Three Dimensions" is different from one-dimensional motion in that it takes into account movement in two or three directions, whereas one-dimensional motion only considers movement along a single axis. This makes the calculations and analysis more complex.

What are some real-life examples of "Motion in Two/Three Dimensions"?

Some real-life examples of "Motion in Two/Three Dimensions" include the movement of a projectile, such as a ball being thrown in the air, the motion of a car driving on a curved road, and the flight path of an airplane.

How is "Motion in Two/Three Dimensions" applied in scientific research?

"Motion in Two/Three Dimensions" is applied in scientific research to understand and predict the movement of objects in various scenarios. It is used in fields such as physics, engineering, and astronomy to study the motion of planets, particles, and other objects in two or three-dimensional space.

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