Robots can get driver's license in Nevada

  • Thread starter Pythagorean
  • Start date
In summary, Google has started a campaign to get Nevada to allow automated cars to drive. Starting March 1st, 2012, innovators can apply for a new kind of robot driver’s license. This technology is being developed for the purpose of making transportation safer and more efficient.
  • #1
Pythagorean
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http://singularityhub.com/2012/02/2...-plate-in-nevada-means-the-driver-is-a-robot/

"An extended campaign in Nevada by Google has led to a new host of provisions which will allow automated cars to legally drive in the state. Starting March 1st, 2012 innovators like Google can officially apply for a new kind of robot driver’s license that will give them permission to openly test their cars on the road"
 
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  • #2
Pythagorean said:
http://singularityhub.com/2012/02/2...-plate-in-nevada-means-the-driver-is-a-robot/

"An extended campaign in Nevada by Google has led to a new host of provisions which will allow automated cars to legally drive in the state. Starting March 1st, 2012 innovators like Google can officially apply for a new kind of robot driver’s license that will give them permission to openly test their cars on the road"

When I talk with elderly people, one of the most common complaints is the loss of independence when they lose the ability to drive. Hopefully technology will progress faster than my age. :biggrin:
 
  • #3
This sounds a bit scary on some levels, but if closed track tests are successful test, then yeah, its time to take it to the next level by testing on the open road, with careful monitoring and control, of course.
 
  • #4
HowardVAgnew said:
This sounds a bit scary on some levels, but if closed track tests are successful test, then yeah, its time to take it to the next level by testing on the open road, with careful monitoring and control, of course.

Google's driven 200,000 miles on open roads in California (about 140,000 before anybody even knew what they were doing)
 
  • #5
I can't remember exactly who said this (a top guy in GM perhaps?) but I read recently that in the last decade there has been a substantial development in the technology behind self-driving cars.

Personally I think this is fantastic. There was always going to come a point where testing needed to go out into the world (beyond the odd experiment by one group). Hopefully widespread testing in a safe and proper manner will bring about the widespread adoption of this technology sooner rather than later.

I'm very interested to see the full ramifications of self driving cars. How will it affect the haulage/freight industries? How will it affect personal car ownership? How will it affect public transport? How will it affect our opinion of machine skill vs people skill? How will it affect town/infrastructure planing? How will the automotive industry change?
 
  • #6
Pythagorean said:
http://singularityhub.com/2012/02/2...-plate-in-nevada-means-the-driver-is-a-robot/

"An extended campaign in Nevada by Google has led to a new host of provisions which will allow automated cars to legally drive in the state. Starting March 1st, 2012 innovators like Google can officially apply for a new kind of robot driver’s license that will give them permission to openly test their cars on the road"
I think this might turn out to be a very bad idea.
 
  • #7
ThomasT said:
I think this might turn out to be a very bad idea.

Thanks for the opinion, care to justify it?
 
  • #8
dipole said:
Thanks for the opinion, care to justify it?

Next comes the right to vote?
 
  • #9
I can see robots outperforming humans in driving. I hope things don't go bad like they happened in case of Toyota recently. Even small malfunctions can get massive bad PR and undo all the progress.Instead of getting full driving license, I guess I will just wait for my robot car :!) I have been waiting for that for quite a few years now.
 
  • #10
I don't understand your point Ivan, but maybe you're joking. We have machines that operate autonomously all the time, trains are capable of driving themselves, airplanes can fly on auto-pilot, most of the technology and goods you own were probably built or assembled using robots at some stage of their manufacture...

If machines can offer a real improvement to human transportation by driving on roads autonomously, why is this a bad thing? Is a robot really less trustworthy than some teenager who's texting/blaring music/chatting with friends/and being reckless all at the same time while driving? We allow them to drive, and in fact the number one cause of deaths among young people is car accidents.

Naysayers really need to justify their opposition to this sort of technology.
 
  • #11
dipole said:
I don't understand your point Ivan, but maybe you're joking.

Yes. :biggrin:
 
  • #12
Any time my dad and I talk about welfare politics he sticks with the argument that 'they should just become truck drivers, that pays a decent wage'. I wonder if he's at risk of being out of an argument
 
  • #13
Ryan_m_b said:
I can't remember exactly who said this (a top guy in GM perhaps?) but I read recently that in the last decade there has been a substantial development in the technology behind self-driving cars.

Personally I think this is fantastic. There was always going to come a point where testing needed to go out into the world (beyond the odd experiment by one group). Hopefully widespread testing in a safe and proper manner will bring about the widespread adoption of this technology sooner rather than later.

I'm very interested to see the full ramifications of self driving cars. How will it affect the haulage/freight industries? How will it affect personal car ownership? How will it affect public transport? How will it affect our opinion of machine skill vs people skill? How will it affect town/infrastructure planing? How will the automotive industry change?
I think it was about a decade ago that I read an article about self driving cars developed in Japan. I think that they had only done very limited road testing, mostly for demonstration purposes.
 
  • #14
It has the potential of reducing traffic fatalities by one for every car involved :biggrin:
 
  • #15
CaptFirePanda said:
It has the potential of reducing traffic fatalities by one for every car involved :biggrin:

This seem unlikely, unless everybody else has a chauffeur and I'm just a chump
 
  • #16
dipole said:
Naysayers really need to justify their opposition to this sort of technology.

Admittedly, I have not followed the topic religiously, but as I confess to being a 'naysayer' -- not a denier, but a "sayer" with some "nays," I would like to communicate my concerns. Humans do stupid things, and certainly the roadway is no exception, but until I see some convincing proof, so far as I am aware, the human brain is far more capable of handling dynamic situations than an artificial computer.

How well can a robot driver identify what is ahead? Can it analyze the erratic driving of another car caused by another driver and determine the likelihood that it is being operated by someone too intoxicated or exhausted to drive predictably, and adjust a safety margin around that vehicle to compensate? Can it see and analyze a puddle, determine the risk of hydroplaning causing loss of control, and adjust driving for safety around it? Can it determine when an obstruction on a roadway or other conditions necessitate temporarily passing the obstruction into oncoming lanes when it is safe to do so? Can it read temporary 'detour' signs diverting traffic from, say, one side of a freeway to the other that cause modern GPS navigation systems to determine you are driving the 'wrong way' and must 'turn around?' Can it react to material falling off a truck or rock at freeway speeds? Can it realize when getting to a destination is impossible because of severe weather conditions, completely stopped traffic or other hurdles and it is time to give up and go home instead?

As I said, I have not followed autonomous drivers, so I do not know the answers to these. Is the answer to each absolutely, yes, the robot driver can handle all of these situations at least as well as a human driver?
 
  • #17
Office_Shredder said:
This seem unlikely, unless everybody else has a chauffeur and I'm just a chump

'Twas just a bit of a joke.
 
  • #18
Actually I'm a bit intrigued of what percent of the time the driver isn't required. For example every time you need to drive your kid someplace, you wouldn't need to do that anymore. Anytime you need to drop a package off someplace, you can just send the car to do that for you. But would people trust their vehicle to do these things? Probably you wouldn't let your car drive your kids anywhere without you seeing how people won't even let their kids play in the yard unsupervised anymore
 
  • #19
They require a bond of 1-3 million dollars to drive your robotic car, but that certainly might be worth it for trucks. A driver that only has to stop for gas and repairs? It might give a whole new meaning to "truck stop".

In another ten years IBM should have their second neuromorphic chip and then we'll see the real terminators start to roll of the assembly line. Robotic cars that learn from experience going to simulated driving school. Cars marketed for the congenial personality of the robotic chauffeur. I just hope the economy models don't demand too much attention.
 
  • #20
Office_Shredder said:
Actually I'm a bit intrigued of what percent of the time the driver isn't required. For example every time you need to drive your kid someplace, you wouldn't need to do that anymore. Anytime you need to drop a package off someplace, you can just send the car to do that for you. But would people trust their vehicle to do these things?
How awesome would it be to send your car to grab your Chinese take-out from the restaurant down the street (when you could have walked instead)?
 
  • #21
1) There's no way I trust the place to get the order right without me there to verify it :P

2) If everyone starts doing it, you have a single location where unsupervised vehicles pull up unlocked waiting for somebody to put something in it? Just hop in and drive away man.
 
  • #22
HowardVAgnew said:
Admittedly, I have not followed the topic religiously, but as I confess to being a 'naysayer' -- not a denier, but a "sayer" with some "nays," I would like to communicate my concerns. Humans do stupid things, and certainly the roadway is no exception, but until I see some convincing proof, so far as I am aware, the human brain is far more capable of handling dynamic situations than an artificial computer.

How well can a robot driver identify what is ahead? Can it analyze the erratic driving of another car caused by another driver and determine the likelihood that it is being operated by someone too intoxicated or exhausted to drive predictably, and adjust a safety margin around that vehicle to compensate? Can it see and analyze a puddle, determine the risk of hydroplaning causing loss of control, and adjust driving for safety around it? Can it determine when an obstruction on a roadway or other conditions necessitate temporarily passing the obstruction into oncoming lanes when it is safe to do so? Can it read temporary 'detour' signs diverting traffic from, say, one side of a freeway to the other that cause modern GPS navigation systems to determine you are driving the 'wrong way' and must 'turn around?' Can it react to material falling off a truck or rock at freeway speeds? Can it realize when getting to a destination is impossible because of severe weather conditions, completely stopped traffic or other hurdles and it is time to give up and go home instead?

As I said, I have not followed autonomous drivers, so I do not know the answers to these. Is the answer to each absolutely, yes, the robot driver can handle all of these situations at least as well as a human driver?

Can it handle a child running after a ball it kicked to the other side of the street? I don't think so.
 
  • #23
Office_Shredder said:
1) There's no way I trust the place to get the order right without me there to verify it :P

2) If everyone starts doing it, you have a single location where unsupervised vehicles pull up unlocked waiting for somebody to put something in it? Just hop in and drive away man.

Naw, it will have a cargo compartment that you will give a temporay acces # to the restraunt for. No unlocked doors
 
  • #24
(that was meant as a prediction, not a statement of fact)
 
  • #25
MarcoD said:
Can it handle a child running after a ball it kicked to the other side of the street? I don't think so.

Yes of course it can.

Pythagorean, yeah that's pretty obvious I don't know why I thought they would have to sit it in the front seat or something
 
  • #26
Office_Shredder said:
Yes of course it can.

Pythagorean, yeah that's pretty obvious I don't know why I thought they would have to sit it in the front seat or something

Why would it? The ball is on the other side of the street, the kid is running in front of the car. Unless it knows that kids play and run after balls, it shouldn't be able to know stuff like that.
 
  • #27
It shouldn't matter what the child is running after, sensors would alert the "driver" that something is about to intersect its path and the car would stop or otherwise avoid the child.
 
  • #28
MarcoD said:
Why would it? The ball is on the other side of the street, the kid is running in front of the car. Unless it knows that kids play and run after balls, it shouldn't be able to know stuff like that.


http://jalopnik.com/5851324/how-googles-self+driving-car-works

It tracks its surroundings omnidirectionally. So it will be able to detect the kid running towards the street and stop to allow him to cross
 
  • #29
Possible, I didn't read the article. Guess as long as it doesn't drive too fast it's okay.
 
  • #30
I'm sure Google is very glad to have received your blessings, Marco.
 
  • #31
Considering that most of Nevada has a population density of less than 10 people per square mile (according to wikipedia), close encounters with kids playing with balls is probably not much of an issue.

In that environment, I expect a human could pass the driving test without ever meeting most hazard situations for real.
 
  • #32
Like anyone cares? It's just something I've witnessed once. It ain't nice.
 
  • #33
From what I've seen human drivers do, I would welcome driving along side a robot!
 
  • #34
MarcoD said:
Like anyone cares? It's just something I've witnessed once. It ain't nice.
Was a robot driving the car?
 
  • #35
Kid getting overrun by a car since it was only watching the ball it was running after.

Oh, no, a robot wasn't driving the car. Guess there would be an argument for it since response time might be faster. Then again, the kid was darting out from between two cars anyway. No idea.
 

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