Science Fiction

  • Thread starter Beren
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Favourite Science Fiction

  • Ender's Game (And all accompanying series)- OSC

    Votes: 5 15.6%
  • Foundation/The Gods Themselves/Nightfall- Asimov

    Votes: 10 31.3%
  • 2001: A Space Odyssey (and the rest of the years) - Arthur C. Clarke

    Votes: 4 12.5%
  • Pastwatch-OSC

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Contact-Carl Sagan

    Votes: 2 6.3%
  • The Light of Other Days- Arthur Clarke and Baxter

    Votes: 1 3.1%
  • The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy-Douglas Adams

    Votes: 9 28.1%
  • Classic Sci-Fi (The Time Machine, etc.)

    Votes: 1 3.1%
  • Sci-Fi Mags

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    32
  • #26
Present readings: Stephen Baxter's Reid Malenfant Series, Iain M. Banks.
Past readings: Heinlein, Dick, Niven, Asimov, Bova.

Favourite SF books: Ringworld, Colony, Farnham's Freehold, Against A Dark Background, The Time Ships.
 
  • #27
selfAdjoint
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I want to put in a plug here for Ken Mcleod's books, like Cassini Division, Star Fraction and Cosmonaut Keep. Wonderful characters and a fresh slant.
 
  • #28
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I also like The Last Legends of Earth, by AA Attanasio. Its kinda idiosynchratic, so I dunno if I can really recommend it, though.
 
  • #29
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....Well scratch that. I'm currently reading Contact whenever I get a chance
That is a great Science Fiction book. I think Sagan should be a Grand Master just for that.
 
  • #30
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Originally posted by marcus
Science is a comedy (Hitchhikers Guide) even if it destroys all life on the planet (Cats Cradle--Vonnegut) and although the world views of twentienth century science are bizarre (Italo Calvino/Jorge Borges) people still look to science to satisfy their intellectual and spiritual needs: In Marquez Hundred Years of Solitude there is a man who tries to take photographs of God.
He sets up a camera in various rooms of his house, arranged to snap a picture at random times, because he believes what he is told, namely God is everywhere, but that human eyes cannot behold the Deity, but a camera because it is Scientific should be able to. this guy is a great character---he has experiences with a magnet and a magnifying glass too. Gypsies are always passing through town and selling him the latest Scientific Development.

People who look for God at the Big Bang are like that guy. they think that cosmology is a scientific device which will take a picture of God for them while they are in some other room of the house and not paying attention. Big Bang theory or quantum theory will somehow give them evidence of the divine or the soul.

When I read science fiction I expect it to tell me something about science as a human bemusement and obsession (not about possible future technologies and colonization romance----I am already impatient enough for life to be spread to other stars that I dont need dramatizations) so although Italo Calvino's "Cosmicomics" is not bad I vote for "Hundred Years of Solitude"
Exellent! your Each and every words very much true for my part also!
 
  • #31
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I've voted for Asimov....... I am a great fan of his writings

Recently I've finished his outstanding works : Foundation.

All five books: From "Foundation" to "Foundation and Earth"
Are awsome....

But I think I must mention, I am also a great fan of the Classics:

Time Machine
Jules Verne's Stories
Adger Allen Poe
Frankenstein

But I can't vote more than once :(
 
  • #32
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Originally posted by Moni
All five books: From "Foundation" to "Foundation and Earth" Are awsome....
Are you aware there are seven books in the Foundation series? (Including the two prequels, "Prelude to Foundation" and "Forward the Foundation".)
 
  • #33
selfAdjoint
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There's also an entertaining non-Asimov book "Psychohistorical Crisis" by Donald Kingsbury. It takes place in the restored Galactic Empire, and we find that the second foundation is just as prone to the flaws of hierarchy as the first empire was. Lots of galactic adventure.
 
  • #34
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Originally posted by Ambitwistor
Are you aware there are seven books in the Foundation series? (Including the two prequels, "Prelude to Foundation" and "Forward the Foundation".)
Oh! Yeah! But those were written after the decision Galaxy will be transformed into "Gaya"! And that's why I didn't feel interest about them :(

Are they are as good as those trilogy???

Though I've read 5 but I still like first 3.

2nd Foudnation was exellent :)

And the Mule ;)
 
  • #35
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Originally posted by selfAdjoint
There's also an entertaining non-Asimov book "Psychohistorical Crisis" by Donald Kingsbury. It takes place in the restored Galactic Empire, and we find that the second foundation is just as prone to the flaws of hierarchy as the first empire was. Lots of galactic adventure.
Thanks! I am the no.1 fan of Sci-Fis....
But here in Bangladesh they aren't easily available :(

But I have read the classics ... translations!
Still I like Jules Verne's all Sci-Fi. H.G.Wells, Ray Bradbury!
 
  • #36
Nereid
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women authors?

No one mentioned Ursula K. LeGuin - Left Hand of Darkness, Lathe of Heaven, and (for children, and adults too) A Wizard of Earthsea. Some of her writing is not scifi at all, and some is, well, not very good.
 
  • #37
J/Psi
my top five in no particular order

Hyperion by Dan Simmons

A Fire Upon the Deep by Vernor Vinge

Consider Phlebas by Iain Banks

Dune by Frank Herbert

The Dosadi Experiment by Frank Herbert
 
  • #38
selfAdjoint
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I thought Consider Phlebas a great book until the end. I felt cheated by that.
 
  • #39
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Has anyone read "Snow Crash" by Neal Stephenson?

It's a fun and fast paced book. Definitely worth a look if you are interested in computers or virtual reality.

My vote is for Asimov, I loved reading the Dr Urth stories when I was growing up.
 
  • #40
selfAdjoint
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I just finished Snow Crash a couple of weeks ago. Great adventure and interesting characters. I thought "William Gibson meets Tim Powers". Cyberpunk plus threats from ancient (but true) mythology, the last being Tim Powers very entertaining specialty (look him up).

Currently reading Gibson's Pattern recognition. Not sf, exactly, nominally present day, but very techy. Hero is a lady whose father disappeared in the 9/11 destruction (or did he?). she's allergic to certain common logos and supports herself as a cool hunter. That's hunter of cool.
 
  • #41
Evo
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Originally posted by selfAdjoint
I just finished Snow Crash a couple of weeks ago. Great adventure and interesting characters. I thought "William Gibson meets Tim Powers". Cyberpunk plus threats from ancient (but true) mythology, the last being Tim Powers very entertaining specialty (look him up).

Currently reading Gibson's Pattern recognition. Not sf, exactly, nominally present day, but very techy. Hero is a lady whose father disappeared in the 9/11 destruction (or did he?). she's allergic to certain common logos and supports herself as a cool hunter. That's hunter of cool.
Thanks! I will check them both out. Anytime someone that has enjoyed a book I like can also recommend others, that is SO helpful. I read so much, so quickly, that I find myself hesitant to finish a good book because I am afraid I won't find more that are as interesting.
 
  • #42
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I don't read as much SF as I'd like to, but I remember especially enjoying Greg Egan's Permutation City and Stephen Baxter's The Time Ships.

Egan has a great web page with fun applets, some of his works, and notes to some of his works.
 
  • #43
J/Psi
Originally posted by selfAdjoint
I just finished Snow Crash a couple of weeks ago. Great adventure and interesting characters. I thought "William Gibson meets Tim Powers". Cyberpunk plus threats from ancient (but true) mythology, the last being Tim Powers very entertaining specialty (look him up).

Currently reading Gibson's Pattern recognition. Not sf, exactly, nominally present day, but very techy. Hero is a lady whose father disappeared in the 9/11 destruction (or did he?). she's allergic to certain common logos and supports herself as a cool hunter. That's hunter of cool.
gibson is one of my favorite authors and _pattern recognition_ is decent. _snow crash_ is very good, as is stephenson's _cryptonomicon_. unfortunately, his latest _quicksilver_ is awful; i gave up giving it the benefit of the doubt after 100 pages and put it down for good; quite a shame really since the story features isaac newton and the early days of physics/scientific method.

dan simmons' latest, _ilium_, is very good
 
  • #44
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I'm a little late replying to this thread but here goes,

Some of my favorite authors/books which haven't been mentioned:

Robert J. Sawyer: The Terminal Experiment, Hominids, Humans, Factoring Humanity

Robert Sawyer seems to have a very good grasp of science. His use of hard science blended with philosophical/moral issues make for excellent reading.

Eric Nylund: Signal to Noise and A Signal Shattered (sequel)

These are the only two novels I have read by Nylund but they are excellent. I've heard them referred to as 'hyperpunk' but I'm not sure what that means. It is, IMHO, an excellent story. Review

Some other previously mentioned works I like:

Arthur C. Clark: Rama series, A Space Odyssey

Isaac Asimov: Foundation series, Robot series


My favorite fantasy series:

Stephen R. Donaldson: The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant, the Unbeliever (had to mention it)
 
  • #45
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G,day I loved Star Hammer that was a good readable sci-fi novel. Walter Williams is also an author I like tremendously. I do a bit of writing myself and have a novel I have written called Doom Of The Shem.
Doom Of The Shem is a science fiction novel that incorporates the horror of military action with the unavoidable hostilities that occur when an alien species invade a planet in search of food. The barbarity of war is brought to light by the work achieved by the nurses and medical personnel of the planets inhabitants. While a full blown military action story emerges from an ensuing war that involves the whole planet. It is especially centered on a squad of the planets army forces, who fight the alien invaders.
doomoftheshem.blogspot.com
 
  • #46
Nabeshin
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You, sir, just replied to a five year old thread.
 

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