Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

See the Transit of Venus Live Here

  1. Jun 5, 2012 #1

    Drakkith

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    You can see the Transit of Venus live here: http://events.slooh.com/
    Starts in 5 minutes.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 5, 2012 #2

    Borg

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

  4. Jun 5, 2012 #3

    jtbell

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    I can see it in one of our bedrooms now, using the sunlight shining in through a window. I fastened binoculars to a tripod, so as to project the image onto a sheet of cardboard. Venus is just barely all the way inside the sun's disk now. I'll get some pictures and post them later; we're going out for dinner shortly.

    I can see some sunspots, too.
     
  5. Jun 5, 2012 #4

    Borek

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    No chances to see anything for me - full overcast, and it is not going to change around sunrise. I can sleep as long as I want, I am not going to miss anything grumpy_borek.png
     
  6. Jun 5, 2012 #5

    Borg

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
  7. Jun 5, 2012 #6

    Chi Meson

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Transit of clouds here too. I am so freakin' upset about this.
     
  8. Jun 5, 2012 #7
    too cloudy here :(

    it's still cool to see the streams, though
     
  9. Jun 5, 2012 #8

    Drakkith

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    I've done some projections onto a paper plate using the lens out of my finder scope, but I can't really see anything. Perhaps my lens is too long of a focal length.
     
  10. Jun 5, 2012 #9

    Borg

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Did you try taking the eyepiece out of your main scope?
     
  11. Jun 5, 2012 #10

    Chi Meson

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    I saw Venus! For about 8 seconds! There was a gap in the clouds. Sunlight suddenly poured into my back window, and I grabbed my sunglasses and two layers of exposed photographic negatives and got a glimpse of the top half of the sun with the tiny dot of Venus about 2/3ds across.

    wheee.
     
  12. Jun 5, 2012 #11
    Nothing but clouds. However, it has gotten a triffle darker outside.
     
  13. Jun 5, 2012 #12

    Astronuc

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor

    Mostly cloudy with small patches of blue sky.
     
  14. Jun 5, 2012 #13
    There's nothing but clouds for me as well though I'm digging nasa's coverage of the transit. No matter how hard I try, I just can't get myself to realize the sheer size, speed, distance etc. of these two objects!
     
  15. Jun 5, 2012 #14

    Astronuc

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor

    This? http://sunearthday.nasa.gov/transitofvenus/
     
  16. Jun 5, 2012 #15
  17. Jun 5, 2012 #16

    dlgoff

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I used jtbell's binoculars method and it's clearly visible here in Kansas.
     
  18. Jun 5, 2012 #17

    Astronuc

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor

    Cool - :cool: - NASA SDO - Venus approaching in 191 Anstrom [sic] (I think that is Angstrom, as in UV)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2014
  19. Jun 5, 2012 #18

    dlgoff

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    That is cool. :cool:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2014
  20. Jun 5, 2012 #19

    Drakkith

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Nope. Do you think using the eyepiece instead of the lens would have worked better?
     
  21. Jun 5, 2012 #20

    jtbell

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    These pics were taken at 6:24 and 7:08 PM EDT (22:24 and 23:08 UT).

    When I was a kid many years ago, my parents bought me a four- or five-volume set of books covering various historical topics in science and math. One chapter was about the transits of Venus. It started with the story of Jeremiah Horrocks, an English astronomer whose "day job" was as tutor for a family in a small village. In 1639, he refined Kepler's calculations of the orbit of Venus and predicted the transit which took place less than four weeks later. (Kepler had predicted the transit of 1631 which apparently nobody actually saw, but thought 1639 would be a near-miss.) Horrocks and one of his correspondents, William Crabtree, were the only two people to witness the transit of 1639.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transit_of_Venus,_1639

    The following transits were in 1761, 1769, 1874, 1882, 2004 and 2012. The next one will be in 2117, so if you missed the two most recent ones, you're probably out of luck.

    When I was a kid, 2004 and 2012 seemed a loooong time away!
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jun 5, 2012
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: See the Transit of Venus Live Here
Loading...