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Should I work with a renowned Physics prof Being an EEE?

  1. Apr 18, 2015 #1
    Hello,
    I am currently a EEE junior year student in an International University. I am looking to shift fields to a more Physics oriented field in my Masters/Phd, something along the lines of Plasma Physics/ Optics/ Accelerator Physics etc
    The thing is I have come across a quite renowned professor and I feel I have a good chance of working with him if I proceed as I have been talking with him for a while. But the catch is that he is a Mathematical Physicist and works on String Theory and stuff. He takes a good number of EEE students from top Uni here to help them switch fields and go into Theoretical Physics. But the thing is I don't want to go into "Pure Theoritical Physics" for Grad School, but more along the line I mentioned earlier, but I do want to work on the more theoretical aspects of those fields.

    So would it be wise to take up this opportunity and work with him, if I do get the chance? I feel I lack the required Mathematical Background to work with him, but I hope I can make it up in time should it be afforded. I should also mention that he's by far more renowned that any Professor in our University. So I guess that working with him will also help me get a good Letter of rec. if I don't blow it up. So what should I do? I hope I am not too vague. Thanks everyone!!
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2015
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 18, 2015 #2

    QuantumCurt

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    The point of an internship or research experience isn't necessarily to get work experience in the exact field that one is interested in pursuing post-graduation. The important part is getting experience in the general field of research and spending some time applying the concepts you've learned to the real world. It sounds like working with this professor could be a great opportunity. If there are other options available that are more to your interests, then you'll have to make that decision. I wouldn't base it solely on the reputation of the professor. Your own interests should be the main factor in deciding.
     
  4. Apr 18, 2015 #3
    hey Thanks for the reply. You really put things in prespective for me. But one fear I have is that I wouldn't be able to cope with the rigor of Mathematics if I work with him. I am okay in Mathematics but I haven't used advanced mathematics in some time and don't know a lot of Mathematics too. So may be I should just start working and see where it leads and work on my Maths ??
     
  5. Apr 18, 2015 #4

    QuantumCurt

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    How much math have you taken? How long has it been since you've taken it? It's typically assumed that undergrads aren't going to have a full repertoire of advanced mathematics under their belt. It is assumed that they'll have the capacity to learn the methods efficiently though. Given that this is a more mathematically intensive area, it's possible that the professor would prefer someone who has taken more advanced math classes. That's something you'd have to find out.

    All that said, reviewing math is never a bad idea. :wink:
     
  6. Apr 19, 2015 #5
    It's been more than a two years since I practiced any serious maths. I've taken upto Differential Equations, Complex Numbers, Probability Theory (Random vectors and stuff), I haven't taken Multivariable calculas in depth(formally) but I get the idea and can solve some beginner problems, Fourier series & transform and Laplace Transform etc I guess you get the idea. But I think I do pick up mathematics fairly quickly, at least that's what I like to think. So what do you think?
     
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