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Simulation, distribution, statistics.

  1. Feb 22, 2012 #1
    I´m wondering how to find out something about distribution functions after I´ve calculated the scewness. I have 15 numbers, mean is 3.206, highest is 7.028 and lowest is 0.9209. Variance is 2.958195. I calculate the skewness and got 0.945.

    I´m wondering which of the following distributions is the best match for the numbers I´ve already calculated. I tried to plot the scors I got but it didn´t seem to make any sense.

    These are the possibilities:
    DU(i,j)).
    Geom(p)).
    Poisson(lambda).
    Weibull(alpha,beta)).
    Gamma(alpha,beta).
    PT5(alpha,beta).

    I was looking for a way to find alpha, beta, gamma etc
    I was thinking if it was something about the Kolmogorov test?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 22, 2012 #2

    chiro

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    Hey skaterboy1 and welcome to the forums.

    For this kind of problem, we use what is called an estimator.

    An estimator is used to get an idea of what a parameter of a distribution might be given a set of data. The estimators that statisticians and scientists used have the properties that they are consistent, unbiased and reliable.

    We have different kinds of estimators like Method of Moments and Maximum Likelihood Estimators. These templates can be applied for general distributions if the distribution has certain properties (for example MLE can't be applied to Uniform distributions because it is a constant function which screws up the estimator).

    What is your mathematical and statistical background like?
     
  4. Feb 23, 2012 #3
    Thank you for the reply. Average I guess. Studying engineering.
    I red more about this and I have to find probability density function and also plot the numbers i have. I have to do the KS test and find out what type of distribution this is.
    I don´t know how to start.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2012
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