So how bad is the employment situation, really?

  • Thread starter ptabor
  • Start date
  • #1
14
0

Main Question or Discussion Point

As a student about to enter a phd program in physics, I couldn't help but notice the posts in the career development section. Essentially, someone wrote a post listing all the reasons why a career in science is a bad idea - namely that it's impossible to find a job.

Surely, the likelihood of finding gainful employment is directly related to one's research experience and skills. It stands to reason that those who choose to research plasma, theoretical physics, astronomy, or other non near term application based topics would have difficulty finding employment - but what is the situation for those who study semiconductors, optics, condensed matter, etc?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
russ_watters
Mentor
19,425
5,590
It all depends on what you want to do. If you study semiconductors and want to find a job making chips, I'd think your odds are pretty good. If you want to study optics for the purpose of being a telescope designer, your odds are probably pretty bad.
 
  • #3
905
4
As another person about to enter a PhD program in physics, I'm also wondering about this. How's the job market for those of us who want to become professors of physics?
 
  • #4
JasonRox
Homework Helper
Gold Member
2,314
3
As another person about to enter a PhD program in physics, I'm also wondering about this. How's the job market for those of us who want to become professors of physics?
Write lots of papers and the job market is pretty good. :tongue:
 

Related Threads on So how bad is the employment situation, really?

Replies
77
Views
8K
Replies
211
Views
27K
  • Last Post
Replies
11
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
23
Views
4K
  • Last Post
Replies
18
Views
8K
  • Last Post
Replies
10
Views
2K
Replies
59
Views
9K
  • Last Post
3
Replies
66
Views
6K
Replies
59
Views
7K
Replies
117
Views
12K
Top