Solving for n: How Many Grams of Hydrogen in 6.25L @ 1.95ATM & 243K?

In summary, to find the number of moles of Hydrogen gas, you can use the ideal gas law equation PV = nRT with the given values of pressure, volume, gas constant, and temperature. By plugging in the values and solving for n, you can find the number of moles of Hydrogen gas.
  • #1
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If there are 6.25 L of Hydrogen gas at a pressure of 1.95 ATM and a temperature of 243 K, how many grams of hydrogen are there?

I know that the equation for the ideal gas law is:
pV = nRT
p = pressure
V = volume
n = number of moles
R = the gas constant, 0.0821 L atm mol-1 K-1
T = temperature

but I don't know how to fill in n, the number of moles.
this is my unfinished equation:
(1.95 atm) (6.25 L) = (n) (0.00821 atm mol-1 K-1) (243 K)

help, please!
 
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  • #2
You know PV = nRT, and you are given P, V, R, and T. You even have R in the correct units. Just solve it!
 
  • #3


To solve for n, we can rearrange the ideal gas law equation to solve for the number of moles (n):
n = (pV) / (RT)
Now, we can plug in the given values for pressure, volume, gas constant, and temperature:
n = (1.95 atm * 6.25 L) / (0.0821 L atm mol-1 K-1 * 243 K)
n = 0.154 mol of hydrogen
To convert moles to grams, we can use the molar mass of hydrogen, which is 2.016 g/mol. Therefore, the total number of grams of hydrogen in 6.25 L at 1.95 ATM and 243 K is:
0.154 mol * 2.016 g/mol = 0.31 grams of hydrogen.
Therefore, there are 0.31 grams of hydrogen in the given conditions.
 

1. How do you calculate the number of moles of hydrogen in a given volume at a specific temperature and pressure?

To calculate the number of moles of hydrogen, we can use the ideal gas law equation which states that PV = nRT, where P is the pressure, V is the volume, n is the number of moles, R is the gas constant, and T is the temperature in Kelvin. Rearranging the equation to solve for n, we get n = (PV)/(RT). Plugging in the given values of 6.25L for V, 1.95ATM for P, and 243K for T, we can solve for n to get the number of moles of hydrogen.

2. What is the conversion factor to convert from moles to grams?

The conversion factor to convert from moles to grams depends on the molar mass of the substance. In the case of hydrogen, the molar mass is 1.008 g/mol. Therefore, to convert from moles to grams, we can multiply the number of moles by the molar mass to get the mass in grams.

3. How do you convert from moles of hydrogen to grams of hydrogen?

To convert from moles of hydrogen to grams, we can use the molar mass of hydrogen, which is 1.008 g/mol, as the conversion factor. This means that for every 1 mole of hydrogen, there are 1.008 grams. Therefore, to convert from moles to grams, we can multiply the number of moles by 1.008.

4. What is the relationship between pressure, volume, and temperature in the ideal gas law equation?

The ideal gas law equation, PV = nRT, shows the relationship between pressure, volume, and temperature. When the pressure of a gas increases, the volume decreases, and vice versa, as long as the temperature and number of moles remain constant. Similarly, when the temperature of a gas increases, the volume increases, and vice versa, as long as the pressure and number of moles remain constant.

5. How does changing the units of pressure and volume affect the number of moles of hydrogen?

The number of moles of hydrogen is directly proportional to the pressure and volume of the gas. This means that if the pressure is doubled while the volume is kept constant, the number of moles of hydrogen will also double. Similarly, if the volume is halved while the pressure is kept constant, the number of moles of hydrogen will also halve. However, changing the units of pressure and volume will not affect the number of moles of hydrogen as long as the values are converted correctly using the appropriate conversion factors.

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