Source for Reviews/New Listings for STEM Titles

In summary: However, this list is not limited to STEM titles and may include other fields as well. Additionally, the AMS bookstore also has a section for reviews of new books, which may be helpful in finding STEM titles that have been reviewed. In summary, while there may not be a specific authoritative source for new and reviewed STEM titles, searching through university press publishers and utilizing book review sources such as the AMS bookstore can provide a good selection of STEM titles to choose from.
  • #1
RJ Emery
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The WSJ and the NY Times, among other media sources, have their best sellers/new titles lists of published books. I seek the same but for STEM titles. (STEM is the acronym for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics.) I can find such lists recommending history or biography or other subjects, but not STEM.

If you know of a authoritative source for new and/or reviewed STEM titles (but excluding vendors), please share it with me. Thank you.
 
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  • #2
I do not think that such lists exist. The market for STEM titles is considerably smaller than for essays and novels. And there are system immanent difficulties, too.
  1. What makes a good book is heavily depending on your learning preferences. This individual criterion is much stronger than it is regarding taste, which is usually the measure for prosa. Taste is an add-on.
  2. STEM is not the true category here: certain areas in certain fields in certain sciences are. A physicist most likely won't purchase a book about bacteria. And a biologist specialized on megafauna possibly won't either. So the entire market structure is a giant tree, where the number of people who are interested in a certain leaf is finally very small.
If you are interested in books which match your personal needs, level of understanding, and way to learn, it is best to ask someone for recommendations whom you can trust and rely on.
 
  • #3
fresh_42 said:
I do not think that such lists exist. The market for STEM titles is considerably smaller than for essays and novels. And there are system immanent difficulties, too.

You may be correct. My search for same has not been satisfactory. Even a compendium of new titles from the various university presses would be helpful. My interests span all of STEM. Thank you for responding.
 
  • #4
RJ Emery said:
You may be correct. My search for same has not been satisfactory. Even a compendium of new titles from the various university presses would be helpful. My interests span all of STEM. Thank you for responding.
The question is not STEM or not, the question is at which level! Hofstadter (GEB), Hawking (Time) and Singh (Fermat) made it onto the usual charts, but they can hardly be called a STEM title. On the other hand and for example I have a book about Virasoro algebras, but I assume it would be difficult to find other interested readers even here on PF - let alone among the readers of NYT or WSJ.
 
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  • #5
fresh_42 said:
The question is not STEM or not, the question is at which level! Hofstadter (GEB), Hawking (Time) and Singh (Fermat) made it onto the usual charts, but they can hardly be called a STEM title. On the other hand and for example I have a book about Virasoro algebras, but I assume it would be difficult to find other interested readers even here on PF - let alone among the readers of NYT or WSJ.
I am a reader of the NYT and the WSJ, and I am interested in all things STEM qualitative or quantatative. The level of complexity is not important. If I do not know the mathematics, I will learn it to add to my repertoire. I have no idea what Virasoro algebras are, but I will soon find out.

One limiting factor for reviews of STEM titles could well be book price. If more than $100 (or other amount), it is probably too technical or of limited scope for most readers.
 
  • #6
RJ Emery said:
You may be correct. My search for same has not been satisfactory. Even a compendium of new titles from the various university presses would be helpful. My interests span all of STEM. Thank you for responding.
A good in between are our insight articles. They are over 400 in number and usually range in difficulty somewhere between a Wikipedia article and a textbook. They are certainly nowhere near to substitute a textbook, but they are interesting appetizers which indicate the directions of research.
 
  • #7

Related to Source for Reviews/New Listings for STEM Titles

1. What is the purpose of a source for reviews/new listings for STEM titles?

A source for reviews/new listings for STEM titles serves as a platform for scientists and researchers to share their findings and discoveries in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. It helps to disseminate information and promote collaboration among scientists.

2. How can I access a source for reviews/new listings for STEM titles?

There are several ways to access a source for reviews/new listings for STEM titles. You can search for specific journals or publications online or visit a university or research library. Many sources also offer online subscriptions for easy access.

3. What types of content can I find on a source for reviews/new listings for STEM titles?

A source for reviews/new listings for STEM titles typically includes peer-reviewed research articles, reviews, editorials, and commentaries related to various STEM topics. It may also feature conference proceedings, book reviews, and news articles related to the field.

4. How can I contribute to a source for reviews/new listings for STEM titles?

If you are a scientist or researcher, you can contribute to a source for reviews/new listings for STEM titles by submitting your research articles or reviews for publication. You can also serve as a peer reviewer or editor for the publication to ensure the quality and accuracy of the content.

5. Are all sources for reviews/new listings for STEM titles reliable?

No, not all sources for reviews/new listings for STEM titles are reliable. It is essential to evaluate the credibility and reputation of the publication before using it as a source. Look for journals that are peer-reviewed, have a high impact factor, and are well-established in the scientific community.

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