Spacecraft - Interplanetary Designs

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In summary, Tony found a website that provides a basic 3d model of Cassini. He is trying to model the effects of his thrust designs on pitch, roll, and yaw.
  • #1
TonyCross
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Spacecraft, Design, engineering. New ideas in Aerospace.
Hi,
Does anyone by any chance have a link to a blueprint-design for an interplanetary spacecraft , either existing or planned.
My reason for asking is I am simulating various aspects of the propulsion and reaction control systems.
I would like to use an existing design to model then experiment with some of my ideas.

Also if anyone else is interested in this subject please contact me.

Cheers Tony

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  • #2
I'm sure you can find something useful here.
https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/cassini/main/index.html

If not, then there are also web sites for all the other NASA interplanetary craft.

Perhaps you meant manned spacecraft . But the simulation principles of propulsion and reaction control systems are mostly the same for manned and unmanned craft.
 
  • #3
anorlunda said:
I'm sure you can find something useful here.
https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/cassini/main/index.html

If not, then there are also web sites for all the other NASA interplanetary craft.

Perhaps you meant manned spacecraft . But the simulation principles of propulsion and reaction control systems are mostly the same for manned and unmanned craft.
Thanks for that,
Cassini was in my opinion one of the most successful, inspiring probes to date.
Certainly one I would be interested in modelling.

Unfortunately the Nasa site only provides paper foldup models!
and images of Cassini, I was looking for more detailed information, detailed technical drawings, to enable me to make a 3d cad model.

Cheers Tony
 
  • #5
After thinking about the most inspiring mission, perhaps it was the Voyager program, which must take that title, I was in my early twenties when Voyager 1 was launched and it did then as it does now bring a lump to my throat, whenever I think about it.

There is a wonderful book called "Pale blue dot" by the brilliant Carl Sagan.
If you ever need a boost to your mood, I highly recommend it.

Carl Sagan pleaded with Nasa to turn Voyager around and take a picture of Earth from a distance of 6 billion kilometers from the Sun.
Very reluctantly they agreed, the rest is history...

https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/resources/536/voyager-1s-pale-blue-dot/

To Quote Carl Sagan.
"Look again at that dot. That's here. That's home. That's us."

Cheers Tony
 
  • #6
I trust you are aware of the extensive line of Haynes "workshop manuals" for the various (mostly manned I presume) NASA and Soyuz spacecraft . A clever idea with some engineering detail.
There must be some spotty detail in the patent records for NASA, but that would be a slog.
I too am a fan of Dr. Sagan and had few lectures from him as a undergrad...interesting fellow. I must admit I most admire his The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark. On my shelf next Thomas Paine's Age of Reason
 
  • #7
hutchphd said:
I trust you are aware of the extensive line of Haynes "workshop manuals" for the various (mostly manned I presume) NASA and Soyuz spacecraft . A clever idea with some engineering detail.
There must be some spotty detail in the patent records for NASA, but that would be a slog.
I too am a fan of Dr. Sagan and had few lectures from him as a undergrad...interesting fellow. I must admit I most admire his The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark. On my shelf next Thomas Paine's Age of Reason
Thanks,
I thought you were joking, I always thought that the Haynes Manuals were just for fixing vehicles!
I have just taken a look at the range Haynes provide, looks very interesting I may consider a purchase of one or two.
As for Thomas Paine, "Age of Reason" is also a terrific read, shame there is not more of it (reason), should be required reading in all US high schools, as the great late Hitch said:
“What can be asserted without evidence can also be dismissed without evidence.”

Dr Sagan first introduced me to the wonders of the universe way back in 1980 with the original Cosmos series, I re-watched it only a year or so ago, and it still holds it's own.

I hadn't thought about the patent office, but it's also a possible reference source.

I did find a basic 3d model of Cassini on the website "Grabcad" I may be able to use this as a template for my modelling.
One of the issues I face is without detailed blueprints or more detailed information it is difficult to assign materials/mass to various parts of the craft, hence the COB is difficult to determine. I am trying to determine the effect that my thrust designs have on Pitch, Roll and Yaw.

As for thrust/propulsion/acceleration, an accurate model is not so important, a box with the correct mass and COB seems pretty good.

Cheers Tony
 
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Related to Spacecraft - Interplanetary Designs

1. How are interplanetary spacecraft designed?

Interplanetary spacecraft are designed using a combination of engineering principles, scientific research, and computer simulations. The design process involves considering factors such as the spacecraft's intended destination, propulsion systems, communication systems, and payload requirements.

2. What materials are used to build interplanetary spacecraft?

Interplanetary spacecraft are typically constructed using lightweight and durable materials such as aluminum, titanium, and carbon composites. These materials are chosen for their strength, resistance to extreme temperatures, and ability to withstand the harsh conditions of space.

3. How do interplanetary spacecraft travel through space?

Interplanetary spacecraft use a combination of propulsion systems to travel through space. These can include chemical rockets, solar sails, ion thrusters, and nuclear propulsion. The specific method of propulsion depends on the mission and the distance the spacecraft needs to travel.

4. How are interplanetary spacecraft powered?

Interplanetary spacecraft are powered by a variety of energy sources, depending on the mission and the technology available. These can include solar panels, nuclear power, or batteries. In some cases, spacecraft may also use gravitational slingshot maneuvers to conserve fuel and extend their mission lifespan.

5. How do interplanetary spacecraft communicate with Earth?

Interplanetary spacecraft use radio waves to communicate with Earth. They are equipped with high-gain antennas that can transmit and receive signals over long distances. These signals are then received by ground stations on Earth, which decode the data and send commands back to the spacecraft.

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