I Spectrometer vs Spectrometry vs Spectroscopy

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new6ton

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How do you differentiate between the three?

I read that "Spectrometry deals with the measurement of a specific spectrum. There are four primary types of spectrometers:

1. Mass spectrometry
2. Neutron triple axis spectrometry
3. Ion-mobility spectrometry
4. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry"

How about Raman Spectrometers and Infrared Spectrometers. Don't they belong to Spectrometry?

Some believe that the main difference is that spectroscopy typically deals with light, mass spectrometry does not.

So do you called it Raman spectroscopy or it is not right to refer it as Raman spectrometry?

It's confusing.
 

ZapperZ

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It is confusing because you encountered the words within a specific context, and think that that is the only way they are used. For example, those people working in ARPES will argue that you are excluding them as well!

Spectroscopy, spectrometry, etc... are simply words to describe the resolving of a signal into its various "components". It can be resolved as a function of energy, frequency, wavelength, angles, momentum, etc... etc. That's it! That's the generic definition of those words.

So when one does, say, x-ray spectroscopy, one tend to often resolve the x-ray signal into its various frequencies (energies) that are usually diffracted. When one does ARPES, one resolve the photoelectron signal into its energy and momentum values... etc... etc.

In other words, whatever the signal that you are measuring, you resolve it into the various components that are of interest, based, of course, on the measuring instrument's capabilities.

Zz.
 

jtbell

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I would say that -scopy and -scope are generic terms that refer to observing some phenomenon, and a device that one uses for making such observations; whereas -metry and -meter more specifically refer to making measurements related to that phenomenon, and a device for making those measurements.

For example, if I arrange a prism and a pair of small telescopes so that I can observe the spectral lines emitted from a light source, I have a spectroscope. If I add a precision angular scale for measuring the angle between the telescopes, so that I can calculate the wavelengths of the spectral lines, I now have a spectrometer.
 

new6ton

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In the Export Strategic dual list items controlled listing, there is this passage:

"3A999 Specific processing equipment, n.e.s.,
as follows (see List of Items Controlled).

f. Chromatography and spectrometry analytical
instruments."

Do you think the spectrometry above also cover Raman spectrometers? Or only mass spectrometers or alike those not related to light?
 

ZapperZ

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In the Export Strategic dual list items controlled listing, there is this passage:

"3A999 Specific processing equipment, n.e.s.,
as follows (see List of Items Controlled).

f. Chromatography and spectrometry analytical
instruments."

Do you think the spectrometry above also cover Raman spectrometers? Or only mass spectrometers or alike those not related to light?
it's as if you either didn't read, or didn't understand all the replies you received in the thread.

zz.
 

marcusl

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Export Control laws are, like all legal matters, complex and practically unintelligible to ordinary mortals (including physicists). Physics Forums is absolutely the wrong place to ask this question (and, by the way, you should have indicated the context up front to avoid confusing the responders). Furthermore, this is a British, or at least EU matter so not just any expert can offer advice. You need to contact your company's or organization's export control officer and legal team.
 

new6ton

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it's as if you either didn't read, or didn't understand all the replies you received in the thread.

zz.
Just asking for emphasis. If spectrometry includes raman spectrometers. Then "f. Chromatography and spectrometry analytical
instruments." includes raman spectrometer, right? Just answer yes or no for emphasis.

It is USA export system. Just asking a simple question about it. I won't ask further question about any export system or procedures. Worry not.
 

marcusl

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In the US you should contact your Empowered Official.
 

new6ton

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In the US you should contact your Empowered Official.
Being non-physicists. They would say spectrometry includes spectrometers. But in the following website: https://verichek.net/spectroscopy-vs-spectrometry.html

Spectroscopy vs. Spectrometry – What’s the Difference in OES?
by Verichek Tech Services | Jul 24, 2017 | Metal Analysis Testing Equipment

Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES) uses a lot of terms, and occasionally some of them are inaccurately used interchangeably. Though there are certain similarities, spectroscopy and spectrometry are not the same thing.
To better understand the difference between them, it is best to start a basic level.


A Quick Definition of Spectroscopy and Spectrometry

Spectroscopy refers to the study of how radiated energy and matter interact. The energy is absorbed by the matter, creating an excited state. When the matter is a metal, it is easy to see the interaction of energy and matter because the metal will produce visible evidence, usually as sparks. The interaction creates some form of electromagnetic waves (EM), often in the form of visible light, such as sparks.

Spectrometry deals with the measurement of a specific spectrum. There are four primary types of spectrometers:
Mass spectrometry
Neutron triple axis spectrometry
Ion-mobility spectrometry
Rutherford backscattering spectrometry

Why didn't they include raman spectrometry?? This is all I'm asking and let's just focus on this.

Why is raman spectrometry not considered as one of the primary types of spectrometers? It's what puzzles me.
 

marcusl

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How are we supposed to know what Verichek Tech Services was thinking? You'll get better responses if you ask for help with a physics question--it's what PF is for.
 

jtbell

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If you want to find out whether you can legally import a specific apparatus from the US, you should probably start by asking the manufacturer directly. They probably know (or can find out) which countries they can legally export it to.
 

ZapperZ

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If you want to find out whether you can legally import a specific apparatus from the US, you should probably start by asking the manufacturer directly. They probably know (or can find out) which countries they can legally export it to.
... which means that this is no longer a physics question, but rather a legal/regulatory/export-import restriction question.

Zz.
 

new6ton

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Some cell phones integrated spectrometers to detect food ingredients or fat contents of items in grocery such as cheese, grapes. I asked the manufacturer. Export license is not required. So my questions are no longer about export. But about the following:

Mass spectrometry
Neutron triple axis spectrometry
Ion-mobility spectrometry
Rutherford backscattering spectrometry

ZapperZ commented: "Spectroscopy, spectrometry, etc... are simply words to describe the resolving of a signal into its various "components". It can be resolved as a function of energy, frequency, wavelength, angles, momentum, etc... etc. That's it! That's the generic definition of those words.:"

What are the other "etc.. etc", how about bank account figures? Is it correct to refer to it as monetary spectrometry? Or should the signal be a physical origin? What other signals are possible that you can resolve into spectrometry?

Also spectrometry comes from spectra. Does it make sense to describe momentum or angles as having spectra/spectrum?
 

DrClaude

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What are the other "etc.. etc", how about bank account figures? Is it correct to refer to it as monetary spectrometry? Or should the signal be a physical origin? What other signals are possible that you can resolve into spectrometry?
This is getting ridiculous.

The term originates from the electromagnetic spectrum, and has been extended by analogy to the distribution in mass of fragments (mass spectrum), the energy/momenutm of electrons (photo-electron spectrum), and so, in the context of physics (and chemistry).

Thread closed.
 

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