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Standard notation for "open integral"

  1. May 13, 2015 #1
    If I have a function defined over an integral, e.g.

    ## F(t') = \int_{-\infty}^{\infty} dt \tilde{F}(t,t') ##

    is there a standard way to denote this integral as being "Open", that is to say if I write

    ## H = F(t') G(t) ##

    I want this to mean

    ## H = \int_{-\infty}^{\infty} dt \tilde{F}(t,t') G(t) ##

    Rather than

    ## H = [\int_{-\infty}^{\infty} dt \tilde{F}(t,t') ] * G(t) ##

    I could make up some notation, but I'd rather not if one exists!

    Many thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 13, 2015 #2
    I don't know too much about this, but I believe a convolution is a closely related concept.
     
  4. May 13, 2015 #3
    Yes I suppose it looks similar if F(t,t') -> F(t-t'), but my question is a little more general.
     
  5. May 13, 2015 #4
    One more difference:-
    ##\int_{-\infty}^{+\infty}\bar{F}(t'-t)G(t) dt=[\bar{F}\ast G](t')## not ##F(t')##.
     
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