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Standards and guidelines (DIN, ISO, ANSI etc.)

  1. Dec 6, 2015 #1
    Lets say I want to build a car. There are national and international standards regarding quality and specifications what I should follow, which say,for example, that I have to have brakes in my car.
    So logically I suppose it is obligatory to follow standard and without it they wouldn't let me build this car for clients. But is it so?

    Remember from lectures professor saying that standards are optional...but it doesn't make sense then...
    Can someone clarify me who provides must-follow rules, and who provides optional guidelines ?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 6, 2015 #2

    Borek

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    Staff: Mentor

    Personally I would prefer car without breaks.
     
  4. Dec 6, 2015 #3
    Haha, lets make fun of a mistake ... any useful comments?
     
  5. Dec 6, 2015 #4
    Have you researched your problem?
    How about using common sense? (think EPA and volkswagen for a concrete example)
     
  6. Dec 6, 2015 #5

    russ_watters

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    Staff: Mentor

    It's standards and codes, not standards and guidelines. Standards are guidelines. Codes are the law. Note however that sometimes code agencies adopt standards as their codes.
    [edit]
    For example, here is a list of New Jersey's adopted codes:
    http://www.state.nj.us/dca/divisions/codes/codreg/#1

    At least one, ASHRAE 90.1, is a standard adopted as a code.

    ...Hmm....NFPA's website doesn't say it that way, but I'm not sure I've ever heard of a code not being the law:
    http://www.nfpa.org/press-room/reporters-guide-to-fire-and-nfpa/about-codes-and-standards

    Considering that the laws of the US are titled "The US Code", that seems incongruous...
    [edit2]
    The world makes sense again:
    http://www.cstools.org/WritingGuide...and_Standards_-_Definitions_&_Requirments.htm
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2015
  7. Dec 6, 2015 #6
    Nice explanation! You should be a teacher! :D

    Thanks!
    But the rest is correct, right? ...1) standards are in general optional -> nice-to-have 2) all the laws give government regarding must-have technical requirements
    Code agencies - you mean government and/or its institutions? What happens for example if a country is in alliance for example EU ... it automatically means that EU codes must be followed?
     
  8. Dec 6, 2015 #7

    russ_watters

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    Staff: Mentor

    Yes, optional in the sense that you won't get arrested/fined for not following them. But you might get fired because the standards are what has been accepted as good practice.
    Yes, code agencies are government institutions. But being in the US, I'm not sure about EU codes. There is a unified set, but I'm not sure about their adoption. More info can be found on it here though: http://www.eurocodes-online.com/en_US/en/about-the-eurocodes/legal-situation-per-country.html

    In addition, most localities have their own additional codes and a legal provision that basically says the code enforcer can demand whatever s/he wants above and beyond the published codes.
     
  9. Dec 6, 2015 #8
    Thank you, russ_watters!
     
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