Steam locomotive Tornado hauling test train reaches 100 mph

In summary, Dave was hoping to find a weather tornado thread, but was disappointed when he saw the subject. There are pros and cons to trains reaching 100 mph, but the focus of the video was enjoyable.
  • #1
Nidum
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  • #2
grrrrrr hahaha :wink:

when I saw the thread subject listing in the section, I thought it was about weather tornadoes, not trainsDave
 
  • #3
davenn said:
grrrrrr hahaha :wink:

when I saw the thread subject listing in the section, I thought it was about weather tornadoes, not trainsDave
I was HOPING it to be about a weather tornado. Clickbait :(
 
  • #4
nuuskur said:
I was HOPING it to be about a weather tornado. Clickbait :(
Why not make your first thread a "weather tornado's" thread ? :smile: who knows how much good information can be shared with people that might actually have limited knowledge about them.
I can make a comment or two :wideeyed:
I was not disappointed in the train, this is our local program :cool: (don't think it will do a 100 mph)

 
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  • #5
RonL said:
this is our local program :cool: (don't think it will do a 100 mph)

+1

Oil fired ?
 
  • #6
Nidum said:
+1

Oil fired ?
Yes,
786-3.jpg
 
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  • #7
100 mph? What's that in real numbers?
 
  • #8
Noisy Rhysling said:
100 mph? What's that in real numbers?

A really good question ?? :cool: o_O faster than 99 mph :biggrin:
 
  • #9
Wonderful videos! I really enjoyed both, although the commentary was a bit over the top, I thought. Two thoughts ...

1) Much depends upon the condition of the track. We have few sections of track left in the US that would support such speeds (yes, I've ridden on the east coast "rocket train," but it rarely goes that fast now).

2) The commentary implied that there was real doubt about whether this could be done or not, as though it was "new territory." That seems strange, since the commentator talked about historic trains that have run substantially faster. Have we gotten to the point that, with all our modern technology, we doubt that we can accomplish that which was done previously? This is difficult to comprehend.

Thanks for posting this video; it was well worth the time to watch.
 
  • #10
Noisy Rhysling said:
100 mph? What's that in real numbers?

That works out to be 146 feet 8 inches per second.
 
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  • #11
Noisy Rhysling said:
100 mph? What's that in real numbers?

160.9 km/h, 44.7 m/s.
 
  • #12
Dr.D said:
2) The commentary implied that there was real doubt about whether this could be done or not, as though it was "new territory." That seems strange, since the commentator talked about historic trains that have run substantially faster. Have we gotten to the point that, with all our modern technology, we doubt that we can accomplish that which was done previously?

I'm afraid so. On the 3 July 1938 the loco Mallard set the still-current world speed record for steam rail traction at 126 mph (203 km/h, 56.3 m/s) further south on the same East Coast Main Line route as Tornado.
 
  • #13
Noisy Rhysling said:
100 mph? What's that in real numbers?
~1.5E-7c

PS, I was pleased to see this was Tornado the loco not tornado the weather
 
  • #14
GrahamN-UK said:
I'm afraid so. On the 3 July 1938 the loco Mallard set the still-current world speed record for steam rail traction at 126 mph (203 km/h, 56.3 m/s) further south on the same East Coast Main Line route as Tornado.

Yes,the record set by Mallard was mentioned in the video, making it all the more strange that we should get so excited today about making it to 100 mph today. Are we celebrating under achievement?
 
  • #15
Dr.D said:
Yes,the record set by Mallard was mentioned in the video, making it all the more strange that we should get so excited today about making it to 100 mph today. Are we celebrating under achievement?
Keep in mind we live in a day and age that has imposed so many restrictions that having to slow down in many locations does make a difference in how quick a recovery of speed can have an affect on top speed over a distance.
 

Related to Steam locomotive Tornado hauling test train reaches 100 mph

What is a steam locomotive?

A steam locomotive is a type of train that is powered by steam, usually generated by burning coal. It was a popular form of transportation during the 19th and early 20th centuries.

What is Tornado?

Tornado is the name of a steam locomotive that was built in 2008 by the A1 Steam Locomotive Trust. It is the first mainline steam locomotive built in the UK since 1960.

What is a hauling test train?

A hauling test train is a train used to test the performance of a locomotive. It is typically loaded with a variety of weights and speeds are measured to determine the maximum weight the locomotive can pull and the top speed it can reach.

Why is reaching 100 mph significant for a steam locomotive?

Reaching 100 mph is significant for a steam locomotive because it is a speed that was rarely achieved by these types of trains. The last steam locomotive in the UK to reach 100 mph was the Mallard in 1938.

What are the benefits of using a steam locomotive?

Using a steam locomotive can have several benefits, including lower carbon emissions compared to diesel engines, a unique and nostalgic travel experience, and the preservation of a historic form of transportation.

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