Stresses and strains in steel sheet

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In summary, the conversation discusses a question about calculating stresses and strains induced by a temperature change in a steel sheet clad with copper layers on both sides. Data for the materials' properties is provided, but there is confusion about the geometry of the specimen. One person suggests that the specimen is free to expand, but the original question does not mention any specific geometry.
  • #1
*Alice*
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Dear all, I am trying to calculate the stresses and strains induced by a 40K change in temperature of a steel sheet of thickness 5mm, that is clad on both sides with 2mm thick layers of copper. For both materials E, alpha (í.e. the thermal expansion coefficient), as well as v (Poissons ratio are given).

My attempt was equating the forces (see attached word document).

This does unfortunately not work and the fact that the Poisson ratios are given makes me think that I have missed something out. Can anyone help?

Thanks a million for any help, hints and suggestions.

Alice
 

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  • #2
I do not see why the temperature change would induce a stress in the specimen as it is free to expand? Could you provide the full question?
 
  • #3
where is the geometry?
 
  • #4
The questions says:

A steel sheet of thickness 5cm is clad on both sides with 2mm thick layers
of copper. Determine the stresses and strains induces by a 40K change in
Temperature

given Data:

for steel: E=210kN/mm^2, v=0.3 (Poissons ratio), alpha=11*10^(-6) 1/K
for copper: E =180 kN/mm^2, v=0.35, aplpha = 30*10^(-6) 1/K

Solution: 70 N/mm^2, 87.5N/mm^2, 0.673 millistrain, 0.24millistrain, 1.77
millistrain


I thought there was geometry, since the steel is clad on top and bottom with 2mm thick layers of copper.
 

Related to Stresses and strains in steel sheet

What is the difference between stress and strain in steel sheet?

Stress is a measure of the internal forces acting on a material, while strain is a measure of the deformation or change in shape of the material under stress. In steel sheet, stress refers to the force applied to the sheet, while strain refers to the resulting change in shape or size of the sheet.

How are stresses and strains measured in steel sheet?

Stresses and strains in steel sheet are typically measured using strain gauges, which are devices that can detect small changes in the shape or size of a material. These gauges are attached to the surface of the sheet and can measure the amount of deformation or strain that occurs when a force is applied.

What factors can affect stresses and strains in steel sheet?

There are several factors that can affect the stresses and strains in steel sheet, including the type and amount of force applied, the thickness and composition of the sheet, and the temperature at which it is being used. Other factors such as the presence of defects or imperfections in the sheet can also impact stresses and strains.

What are some common applications of studying stresses and strains in steel sheet?

Understanding stresses and strains in steel sheet is crucial in many industries, such as construction, automotive, and aerospace. It allows engineers to design structures and components that can withstand the expected forces and loads, ensuring safety and durability. Additionally, studying stresses and strains can also help detect potential failures or weaknesses in the material.

How can stresses and strains in steel sheet be minimized?

To minimize stresses and strains in steel sheet, engineers may use techniques such as annealing to reduce internal stresses, or by altering the sheet's composition or thickness to better withstand external forces. Proper design and manufacturing processes can also help reduce the likelihood of excessive stresses and strains in steel sheet.

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