1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

String Theory, problems and solutions

  1. May 7, 2009 #1

    malawi_glenn

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Hi

    I was wondering if anyone knows a good book which contains problems and solutions to string theoretical physics for beginners.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 7, 2009 #2

    George Jones

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    You could try to work your way through Zwiebach's A First Course in String Theory. It has lots of easy exercises and more difficult problems, but it doesn't give solutions.
     
  4. May 7, 2009 #3

    malawi_glenn

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    I have that book, and I know there is solution manual for teachers.

    Was just wondering since I know there are such books for "everything else" :-)
     
  5. May 8, 2009 #4
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  6. May 8, 2009 #5

    malawi_glenn

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  7. May 8, 2009 #6
    Sorry didn't know it was that bad. I needed a simple overview once of something in QFT and couldn't find it in that book so I returned it.
     
  8. May 8, 2009 #7

    malawi_glenn

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    The worst is all the sloppy errors, and that it is focused on particle physics, it should be called "particle physics demystified (with many typos)" LOL
     
  9. May 9, 2009 #8
    Polchisnki is the way to go, String Theory Vol 1.
     
  10. May 9, 2009 #9

    malawi_glenn

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    I've hear many bad things about it, some consider Green & Witten's book "superstring theory" THE introductory textbook. But maybe the best is to start with Polchisnki's book after Zchwiebach due to its modernity?
     
  11. May 9, 2009 #10

    George Jones

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    There is also another, more advanced introduction, String Theory and M-Theory: A Modern Introduction by Katrin Becker, Melanie Becker, and John H. Schwarz,

    https://www.amazon.com/String-Theor...=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1226585815&sr=1-1.

    From its preface: "The reader is assumed to have some familiarity with quantum field theory and general relativity. It is also very useful to a have broad mathematical background. Group theory is essential, and some knowledge of differential geometry and basic concepts of topology is very desirable."
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  12. May 13, 2009 #11
    Polchinski certainly has its flaws, but for a lot of people it is still the way to go. The problem with the book is mostly that it's vague and technical at some points - the book is definitely not suitable of the less-technical reader. I don't have much experience with GSW but yea, it is also considered a classic.

    Zwiebach is a nice book, but aimed at undergraduates. It hardly treats topics like conformal field theory and a lot (and I do mean a LOT) is left out. This book doesn't (or hardly) requires experience in QFT and GR and it introduces some of this material.

    Becker, Becker and Schwarz is also a good choice, but a little less deep than Polchinski. The biggest difference between this book and Polchinski (or Green, Schwarz and Witten) is that it's also a modern book and treats some of the more advanced topics (M-theory, gauge/gravity duality) which do not appear in the older books. This is nice, because it gives you an idea of where modern-day research (i.e. the problems) stands.

    If you've had classes in GR and QFT you should skip Zwiebach altogether and start with Becker, Becker, Schwarz if you wanna have a first, decent treatment on String Theory. If you really mean business skip to the more advanced texts such as Polchinski or Green, Schwarz, Witten. The latter books have a fairly steep learning curve though and you'll miss out on the modern day topics. But if you're really serious about learning string theory you eventually end up with these books anyway.

    You can also follow the online class on this website (follows Polchinski Vol 1.):

    http://www.pirsa.org/C09001

    Edit: do note that GSW doesn't have any exercises.
     
  13. May 13, 2009 #12

    malawi_glenn

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Yeah, My thought was that i start with Zweibach, and then go on for some more advanved text. The thing is that I am in the middle of learning QFT and GR (i mean LEARNING it) and was hoping for making my diploma Masters thesis in String Theory and was actually hoping for doing ads/CFT correspondence.

    And meanwhile, study string theory by using books and learning by practive (solving problems) and it is always good, when you are a beginner, to at least have the answer and hints to the problem you are solving so that you can build up a confidence in yourself.

    So that was my plan, starting of easy with Zweibach meanwhile increasing my knoweledge in QFT and GR, then start the real deal.
     
  14. Apr 20, 2010 #13
    Sorry

    Has anybody got solution manual to Katrin Becker Melanie Becker John H. Schwarz - String Theory and M-Theory: A Modern Introduction

    It would be realy useful.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: String Theory, problems and solutions
  1. String Theory (Replies: 5)

  2. String Theory Math? (Replies: 6)

  3. Books on string theory (Replies: 2)

Loading...