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Successive Substitution vs Newton's Method

  1. Apr 13, 2014 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    Name disadvantages of the Successive Method vs Newtons for solving nonlinear equations?


    2. Relevant equations



    3. The attempt at a solution
    I went all through the textbook and this is all I could find on the successive method disadvantages but these are not compared to Newtons.

    Successive Method-

    May diverge

    Recursion equation formulation that
    guarantees conversion not obvious

    Performance depends on recursion
    equation

    What am I missing or am I correct?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 13, 2014 #2

    NascentOxygen

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    "conversion" ← "convergence"

    ss is typically slow to converge, though just occasionally you may fluke a fast-converging rearrangement

    if there exist multiple solutions to the original equation, you may never manage to discover those creative rearrangements sometimes necessary to lead to finding every solution

    (With ss you can't gauge how close you are to the solution when slowly approaching it from one side, and I suspect that Newton's method may have an improvement on this, but I forget. That may be something you can investigate.)

    You'd probably get a slew of responses if you posted this in the maths homework forum .
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2014
  4. Apr 13, 2014 #3
    Ok man well I think your stuff is good enough I can research from here.
     
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