• Support PF! Buy your school textbooks, materials and every day products Here!

Suggestions for 9th Grade Physics Textbooks?

  • Classical
  • Thread starter CaesarMagnam
  • Start date
  • #1

Main Question or Discussion Point

Greetings, fellow physicists! I was wondering if you could tell me where I can find some 9th Grade Physics resources to study it. I'm highly interested in textbooks with different tasks and equations to solve, so I came here for your help. All your advices are appreciated.
P.S. I prefer using mobile resources such as eBooks, PDF files etc.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
12,518
8,933
I'm not quite sure, whether they are suitable, as they address the early years of a study, but you can at least have a look and see what it means to deepen your knowledge: https://openstax.org/subjects

Maybe they can provide you with some keywords for a better search on the internet.
 
  • #3
972
223
I would focus my efforts in learning more mathematics. Once you start the study of calculus, you should dive into physics. Calculus makes learning mechanics easier.
 
  • #4
jtbell
Mentor
15,505
3,300
9th Grade Physics resources
In the US where I am, most students in 9th grade have studied only some elementary algebra, and no trigonometry or calculus. Most students don't start studying physics until 11th or 12th grade, when they have studied sufficient mathematics for an algebra/trig level course, or a calculus level course. It would help if you tell us how much mathematics you're studied. That is more meaningful than your current grade level.
 
  • #5
mathwonk
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
10,780
951
I am a mathematician rather thn a physicist, but I like this little book that helps understand the ideas of physics with very little math. Thinking Physics, by Lewis Carroll Epstein.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/0935218084/?tag=pfamazon01-20
 
Last edited:
  • #6
In the US where I am, most students in 9th grade have studied only some elementary algebra, and no trigonometry or calculus. Most students don't start studying physics until 11th or 12th grade, when they have studied sufficient mathematics for an algebra/trig level course, or a calculus level course. It would help if you tell us how much mathematics you're studied. That is more meaningful than your current grade level.
My mathematics level is a bit better than intermediate algebra (but I might be wrong). Sorry but are you sure that usually students don't start studying physics until grade 11 or 12?
 
  • #7
972
223
My mathematics level is a bit better than intermediate algebra (but I might be wrong). Sorry but are you sure that usually students don't start studying physics until grade 11 or 12?
Yes, anything short of this is considered superficial...

I would advice you to continue learning more mathematics, until you are at the beginning Calculus level. Then you can start learning classical mechanics. Make sure that you build a strong foundation.

Have a look at Serge Lang: Basic Mathematics.
This is a pre-calculus book. It reviews from beginning algebra to pre-cal.

Did you have a study of Geometry, that covered proofs?
If not, Moise/Downs: Geometry. I like this book, one of my favorite. No bs real mathematics, but carefully written.
You can also try Harold Jacobs: Geometry. The first and second edition are the ones to purchase. Latter editions ruined a good book.
For Trigonometry. You can buy a run of the mill old edition of any trig based book...

You do need to learn more math tho, because if you could learn some physics. Then, it would be watered down, some oversimplifications that are plain wrong, and may create "bad habits" when trying to learn "real" physics.
 
  • #8
gleem
Science Advisor
Education Advisor
1,595
949
I disagree. Of course there are simplifications. Remember what Einstein said.: If you cannot explain it to your grandmother you do not understand it. So did his grandmother know calculus? You already have some ideas of physics which might be misconceptions. Studies have shown that half of students who take physics retain their misconceptions after finishing the course. So what harm can be done and you might correctly learn the concepts if you get the right sources.. You could start by looking online at Khan Academy ( https://www.khanacademy.org/signup ) which is free and has many video on physics concept using algebra. and is well respected. Another source is Paul Hewitt founder of Conceptual Physics with very little math but still convey the ideas behind the math. see his free videos at http://www.conceptualphysics.com/hewitt-drew-it.html. He also has a text to go with the videos.

If these are too easy go to you school library and see what you can find or ask the physics teacher for advice. He/she won't bite (at least not usually). I started physics by being interested in electronics with nothing but Ohm;s law for DC circuits to work with and didn't find it too difficult to move up to AC circuits and radio. You needn't be too formal and you can jump around and start asking questions like what is this all about, what is it used for, or how do they explain this or that? .It will all straighten out if you are conscientious.

Of course learn as much math as you go. The physics might help your math and the math will help your physics. So get your feet wet
 
  • #9
jasonRF
Science Advisor
Gold Member
1,248
285
The book suggested by gleem is pretty good. One of my daughters used it for her required freshman physics course. While I am not fond of starting high school science with physics (I don't know why some of the districts around here do this!), the book was reasonable.

good luck,

jason
 

Related Threads for: Suggestions for 9th Grade Physics Textbooks?

  • Last Post
2
Replies
30
Views
29K
  • Last Post
Replies
15
Views
46K
Replies
5
Views
9K
Replies
2
Views
7K
Replies
1
Views
6K
  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
4K
Replies
5
Views
2K
Top