Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Featured Super Blue Blood Moon

  1. Feb 1, 2018 #1

    lekh2003

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    I just wanted to see anybody's opinion on the super blue blood moon yesterday night (at least for me).

    I couldn't catch a glimpse of it in Sydney since it had been very hot for a few days and clouds had taken over the sky. I could however see an unusually bright red tint in one area of the sky. I was disappointed staying up quite late for it on a school night, but lets hope I can see it next time (2037, I think).

    Did anybody see it? Anywhere in the world besides Oceania?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 1, 2018 #2

    Wrichik Basu

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    From Kolkata, we had a view of the blood moon, not the super one. The size didn't increase too much.
     
  4. Feb 1, 2018 #3

    lekh2003

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    At least you could see it:frown:. We were supposed to get a full hour of totality only to see clouds.
     
  5. Feb 1, 2018 #4

    Wrichik Basu

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    That's sad. Here also, it was a bit cloudy at first, then it cleared up to give a crystal-clear view. I'll upload the photos here once I copy them from my camera.
     
  6. Feb 1, 2018 #5
    I had a pretty good view of the super moon, but there was only a partial eclipse where I live. There weren't too many clouds, but the moon didn't look that much bigger than normal. It seemed bigger the night before (but that was when the moon was lower on the horizon and slightly distorted by the atmosphere)
     
  7. Feb 1, 2018 #6

    Wrichik Basu

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    The moon appears larger only when near the horizon, and the size decreases as it goes up in the sky.

    Sadly, in Kolkata, we cannot see the horizon - it's only buildings and buildings everywhere. So, the size of the moon was almost the same as any other day.

    @lekh2003 Just before the total eclipse started:

    image.jpg
     
  8. Feb 1, 2018 #7
    Wow, that's a great picture.
     
  9. Feb 1, 2018 #8
  10. Feb 1, 2018 #9
    From northeastern massachussets, USA We could see it. I do not have a photo though
     
  11. Feb 1, 2018 #10

    OmCheeto

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Ha! I called them out yesterday on one of those photos. The eclipse was NOT visible from England, and yet they included one from the Bristol area.
    I researched it further, and the photographer, Tim Graham, tagged his image "Supermoon, January 31st 2018", so I let him off the hook. Being on the horizon, it only looked eclipsed, as it was quite red. [ref]

    Nice photo though.

    ps. I would probably not have noticed the discrepancy had it not been for a minor argument in the other PF eclipse thread, which prompted me to find out what "Europe" was, and finding out what the total eclipse would have looked like in Moscow, had it not been cloudy.
     
  12. Feb 1, 2018 #11
    Yep.I saw. The moon was pretty cool.But I noticed a change in the positions of moon. I mean when I saw blood moon ,it was in one position and when I saw full moon ,it was in another position from my place.When it is blood moon ,it looked almost looked like planet Mars.
     
  13. Feb 1, 2018 #12
    I saw the whole eclipse except a bit of beginning but I didn't any blood or red colour. It was all white for me.
     
  14. Feb 1, 2018 #13

    Wrichik Basu

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    It appeared red just before the total eclipse started. When it was ending, it was completely white.
     
  15. Feb 1, 2018 #14

    PhanthomJay

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    The super moon appeared larger than a typical average moon size because it's orbit was closer to earth than average. That is one reason for its large appearance to the trained observer. The other reason, as I noted the night before, when I viewed it setting on the west horizon, was due to the optical illusion created when you view it just rising or setting on the horizon. It has nothing to due with the atmosphere. It's an optical illusion, and it's closeness to earth combined with that horizon effect made it appear HUGE, although I recall having seen it bigger many years ago.
     
  16. Feb 1, 2018 #15

    davenn

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member
    2017 Award


    you had a view of both !! .... maybe you don't understand what a supermoon is ??

    that's NOT why it is called a supermoon

    no it wasnt

    for a supermoon, its location relative to the horizon is, well, irrelevant ....
    It is called a supermoon BECAUSE it is closer to Earth than normal

    Dave
     
  17. Feb 1, 2018 #16

    davenn

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member
    2017 Award

    so, unfortunately, you didn't see the eclipse
    you must have been outside the eclipse area
     
  18. Feb 1, 2018 #17

    davenn

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member
    2017 Award

    That's well into the eclipse ( not before it started)

    nice pic :smile:
     
  19. Feb 1, 2018 #18

    Wrichik Basu

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    The picture that I posted was taken with 120x zoom. Compared to the pics in this page (posted in #8), the moon that we saw was quite small.

    What we saw was a super moon in the strict sense of the term, but the size didn't increase much.
     
  20. Feb 1, 2018 #19

    lekh2003

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    120x zoom?! What kind of camera were you using, and how many megapixels was the original image?
     
  21. Feb 1, 2018 #20

    Wrichik Basu

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    It's a Panasonic digital camera. The camera provides 60x zoom, rest was digital zoom in intelligent auto mode.
     
Share this great discussion with others via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted