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Switching from physics to finance

  1. Nov 13, 2015 #1
    Hey everyone.

    I'm currently doing my Master in Theoretical Physics, because I like to study physics, but I don't want to have a career in physics. Right now I'm looking at a career in (quantitative) finance. I don't have any knowledge of it yet. Does anyone have any tips on making this switch? (Such as recommended books, etc.)

    Thanks :)
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 13, 2015 #2

    andrewkirk

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    I studied maths, physics and computer science at uni, then embarked on a career in finance by doing a post-graduate qualification as an actuary.

    If you are doing quantitative finance a core part will be understanding derivatives pricing. The 'bible' of the subject is John Hull's 'Options Futures and Other Derivatives', which I would strongly recommend. A good supplement to that, being somewhat more mathematical and relating the stochastic processes being discussed to fundamental results of measure theory, is Baxter and Rennie's 'Financial Calculus'.

    Emmanuel Derman, a physicist who switched to finance and succeeded, wrote a book about it 'My Life as a Quant: Reflections on Physics and Finance'. I haven't read it, but I'm told it's quite good
     
  4. Nov 13, 2015 #3
    You could search for TwoFishQuant's old posts. In some ways they may be a bit outdated now, but they should still give you a lot of flavor for what the switch to a quant involves.
     
  5. Nov 13, 2015 #4
    I have John Hull's Finance book and it looks very good although Finance is not my area.
     
  6. Nov 15, 2015 #5
    Thanks for the suggestions everyone. I'll check them out.
     
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