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Medical TED Video: Iain McGilchrist: The Divided Brain

  1. Oct 25, 2011 #1

    rhody

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    Interesting http://www.ted.com/talks/iain_mcgil..._campaign=newsletter_weekly&utm_medium=email"".
    Rhody...
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 26, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 25, 2011 #2

    Pythagorean

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    I enjoyed that, thank you
     
  4. Oct 25, 2011 #3

    rhody

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    Hey,

    Did you find anything controversial that he said, especially toward the end of the video ?

    Rhody... :confused:
     
  5. Oct 25, 2011 #4

    Pythagorean

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    Well, he kind of went back to the false imagination/rationale duality in the end, but this is a cartoon, not a peer-reviewed journal. It's role is to give one a general idea and stimulate interest.
     
  6. Oct 25, 2011 #5

    rhody

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    Thanks, I picked up on that too...

    Rhody...
     
  7. Oct 26, 2011 #6

    apeiron

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    Snazzy animation. But yes, he goes from an emotion/logic divide to an intuition/reason divide by the end. So one divided brain replaced by a not much different divided brain.

    The trick is to instead frame the description of the difference in a way that it is clearly complementary - two aspects of processing that combine to produce the balanced whole.

    So think of the left/right brain story as being about figure and ground, part and whole, focus and context. The left brain zooms in to isolate the detail and the right brain steps back to take in the panorama. Every moment of understanding is some combination of this local/global analysis.

    And the brain is in fact organised by a whole bunch of processing dichotomies - sensory~motor, attention~habit, what~where, endogenous~exogenous, plasticity~stability, etc. Things always divide into two and then work together. Differentiate so as to be able to integrate.
     
  8. Oct 26, 2011 #7

    rhody

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    aperion,

    You have a gift of being able to express things in juxtaposition. Sometimes you remind me of Murray Gell-Mann. Are you a linguist as well ?

    Rhody...
     
  9. Oct 26, 2011 #8

    DevilsAvocado

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    Thanks rhody, nice video, it deserves to be embedded.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dFs9WO2B8uI&hd=1
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dFs9WO2B8uI

    I don’t know if the work of Michael Gazzaniga and Roger Sperry on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Split-brain" [Broken] is now 'obsolete', but according to this video it seems difficult to refute completely:


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aCv4K5aStdU

    My 'feeling' is that there is (to some extent) plasticity and adaption in the brain (in case of injury for example), and that the "completeness of the network" is what counts (neurons firing in different parts of the brain). Maybe it’s a little hazardous to point out small separate areas in the brain as "this and that" function... but I could (of course) be wrong...

    On the other hand, the video clearly shows that language is located in the left hemisphere.


    P.S. Naturally I find it very interesting that, according to McGilchrist, the devil’s advocate is located in the right hemisphere. :smile:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 5, 2017
  10. Oct 26, 2011 #9

    Pythagorean

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    The vertebrate brain is definitely more functionally separated then the bundles of nerves that non-segmented creatures have. Its one of the great strides in evolution.
     
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