The meaningfulness item on math probability

In summary: What does "P(A)" mean?I meant that ; sometimes we get a probability ratio of for example of : 1/ 5 ∧ 23 from a...I meant that ; sometimes we get a probability ratio of for example of : 1/ 5 ∧ 23 from a calculationbut,in fact,a number of; 1/ 5 ∧ 8 for that is perfectly the absolute answer.
  • #1
boby
4
2
TL;DR Summary
All probability numbers that calculated , depending on the subject ,have a boundary of meaningfulness,...
Hello,
In probability math,because of math's nature that is merely quantitative and not
a qualitative, for any case,it give you just a number; so, I think for every cases,
there should be a boundary probability number that is " meaningfulness " just
for that specified case and out of that boundary is not meaningful and that is just
a meaningless number.

Thanks,
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
boby said:
Summary:: All probability numbers that calculated , depending on the subject ,have a boundary of meaningfulness,...

Hello,
In probability math,because of math's nature that is merely quantitative and not
a qualitative, for any case,it give you just a number; so, I think for every cases,
there should be a boundary probability number that is " meaningfulness " just
for that specified case and out of that boundary is not meaningful and that is just
a meaningless number.

Thanks,

I think this is getting more at statistics than probability theory.
 
  • Like
Likes FactChecker
  • #3
boby said:
Summary:: All probability numbers that calculated , depending on the subject ,have a boundary of meaningfulness,...

Hello,
In probability math,because of math's nature that is merely quantitative and not
a qualitative, for any case,it give you just a number; so, I think for every cases,
there should be a boundary probability number that is " meaningfulness " just
for that specified case and out of that boundary is not meaningful and that is just
a meaningless number.

Thanks,
Yes. Probabilities greater than 1 or less than 0 are not meaningful.
 
  • Like
Likes sysprog
  • #4
We are left to guess at what you mean by "meaningful". Do you want to exclude outliers in a sample of data? Do you want to exclude rare events, no matter how significant they may be if they do happen? I agree that really surprising data points should be examined closely to see if something went wrong in the experiment or if they are things that are valid, but you hadn't thought of them before. Please describe what you mean.
 
  • #5
Dale said:
Yes. Probabilities greater than 1 or less than 0 are not meaningful.
I mean that there are many cases in which, when we calculate and get a probability ratio number like that; P(A),but
in real for Pa(A) less than P(A),the absolute and certain answer is Pa(A) .
 
  • #6
boby said:
I mean that there are many cases in which, when we calculate and get a probability ratio number like that; P(A),but
in real for Pa(A) less than P(A),the absolute and certain answer is Pa(A) .
What does "Pa(A) less than P(A)" mean?
 
  • #7
boby said:
I mean that there are many cases in which, when we calculate and get a probability ratio number like that; P(A),but
in real for Pa(A) less than P(A),the absolute and certain answer is Pa(A) .
I am not sure I understand what you are saying. It sounds like maybe you think probabilities should have a lower threshold. But that would make the probability density function unnormalized.

Could you be more descriptive and explicit? Perhaps with a concrete example.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Likes sysprog
  • #8
Partly for difficulties with the English language and possibly for other reasons, I am not able to understand what question is being asked.
 
  • Like
Likes Dale
  • #9
I meant that ; sometimes we get a probability ratio of for example of : 1/ 5 ∧ 23 from a calculation
but,in fact,a number of; 1/ 5 ∧ 8 for that is perfectly the absolute answer.
 
  • #10
boby said:
I meant that ; sometimes we get a probability ratio of for example of : 1/ 5 ∧ 23 from a calculation
but,in fact,a number of; 1/ 5 ∧ 8 for that is perfectly the absolute answer.
Can you give a specific example? Say you have five driferent cards and you draw one, then put it back, shuffle, repeat twenty three times. The probability to get the same card is (1/5)^23. What is wrong with this answer and what is "prefectly the absolute answer"?
 
  • #11
boby said:
I meant that ; sometimes we get a probability ratio of for example of : 1/ 5 ∧ 23 from a calculation
but,in fact,a number of; 1/ 5 ∧ 8 for that is perfectly the absolute answer.
This is incorrect. It will lead to unnormalized probability density functions.
 
  • #12
I am not learned about probability (at all), but here would be my interpretation of the question.

Let's try to think about something like a fair coin toss. However, we could add something like a 'boundary condition' saying that when we run a trial run of coin toss then in the "running average" the ratio of heads (divided by total no. of trials) can't drop below 0.3 for example.

So if we run the trial 100 times and get 30 heads and 70 tails. Then before we even run the next trail we know that a head will occur because otherwise the ratio drops below 0.3

Perhaps this might be something closer to what OP was saying ... just a guess.
 
  • #13
boby said:
I meant that ; sometimes we get a probability ratio of for example of : 1/ 5 ∧ 23 from a calculation
but,in fact,a number of; 1/ 5 ∧ 8 for that is perfectly the absolute answer.
If the calculation was done correctly, and the assumptions are correct, then there is no other "in fact" answer.

EXAMPLE: Suppose there is a jar with 5 balls, labeled A, B, C , D, E. You randomly (blindly) select one ball from the jar and replace it, 23 times. The probability of getting all A's is 1/5 ^ 23. There is no other answer.

That being said, there certainly are errors that can be made in a calculation of probability. A calculated probability of 1/5^23 might be wrong, where 1/5^8 is correct. Is there a particular situation that you are worried about?
 
  • Like
Likes Dale
  • #14
All the above answers are very significant but ;
As you know that we faced to a few cases(events),in our real life daily,that their occurrences are inevitable
but their math probabilities are still get you numbers that show uncertains!
 
  • #15
We are now on post 15 and I still don’t have any idea what you are talking about. This thread is closed.

If you post anything else please make a sincere effort to be clear in your description of the question and when you respond please do so by quoting the person you are responding to and directly addressing their post. Also, please review the forum rules, including the rules on proper grammar.
 

Related to The meaningfulness item on math probability

1. What is the meaning of the "meaningfulness" item in math probability?

The "meaningfulness" item in math probability refers to the significance or relevance of a mathematical concept or problem. It considers whether the concept or problem has real-world applications or implications.

2. How is the "meaningfulness" of a math probability concept or problem determined?

The "meaningfulness" of a math probability concept or problem is determined by its practicality and usefulness in real-world situations. It may also be evaluated based on its ability to provide insights or solutions to real-world problems.

3. Why is the "meaningfulness" of a math probability concept or problem important?

The "meaningfulness" of a math probability concept or problem is important because it adds context and relevance to the subject. It helps students understand the practical applications of the concepts they are learning and can motivate them to engage more deeply with the material.

4. Can a math probability concept or problem be considered "meaningful" if it has no real-world applications?

Yes, a math probability concept or problem can still be considered "meaningful" even if it has no direct real-world applications. It may still have value in developing critical thinking and problem-solving skills, which can be applied in various contexts.

5. How can teachers incorporate the "meaningfulness" item into their math probability lessons?

Teachers can incorporate the "meaningfulness" item into their math probability lessons by providing real-world examples and applications of the concepts being taught. They can also encourage students to think about how the concepts can be used in different scenarios and to discuss the practical implications of their solutions.

Similar threads

  • Set Theory, Logic, Probability, Statistics
Replies
11
Views
798
  • Set Theory, Logic, Probability, Statistics
Replies
7
Views
1K
  • Set Theory, Logic, Probability, Statistics
Replies
4
Views
1K
  • Set Theory, Logic, Probability, Statistics
Replies
11
Views
790
  • Set Theory, Logic, Probability, Statistics
Replies
6
Views
1K
  • Set Theory, Logic, Probability, Statistics
Replies
5
Views
2K
  • Set Theory, Logic, Probability, Statistics
Replies
3
Views
2K
  • Set Theory, Logic, Probability, Statistics
Replies
33
Views
2K
  • Set Theory, Logic, Probability, Statistics
2
Replies
57
Views
2K
  • Set Theory, Logic, Probability, Statistics
Replies
3
Views
396
Back
Top