The SM finaly realized as particles w/o particle .

In summary, Robert Finkelstein has been researching quantum knots and preonic nuclei as complementary models for elementary particles. He recently uploaded a paper where he shows a connection between his work and the field flux knots that Frank Wilczek has been looking for. However, Wilczek's work is not cited in the article. Additionally, Finkelstein's previous paper on the same topic also does not have any references to related work. This is in contrast to other researchers, such as Bilson-Thompson, who have cited earlier work in their papers. Wilczek's paper discusses the quantum kinematics of identical particles and suggests new possibilities, beyond bosons and fermions, in 2+1 dimensions. He also briefly mentions experimental real
  • #1
MTd2
Gold Member
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The SM finaly realized as "particles w/o particle".

Robert Filnkelstein has been trying to find a whole description based on quantum knots. Today, he uploaded a paper in which he finally finds it. Although not cited in the article, these are extremely similar the field flux knots which Wilczec looked for.

http://arxiv.org/abs/0912.3552
 
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  • #2


Does anyone have the reference of the XIXth century work on knot theory as a way to classify the chemical atoms?
 
  • #3


Not a book, but a paper. This is a reference:

Thompson, W. T. "On Vortex Atoms." Philos. Mag. 34, 15-24, 1867.

And here's a link to the paper:

http://www.info.global-scaling-verein.de/Others/VortexAtoms.pdf

And a html version of it:

http://zapatopi.net/kelvin/papers/on_vortex_atoms.html

EDIT:

The above paper is the same one in the reference 1. It was just re edited and republished in a different magazine.
 
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  • #4


MTd2 said:
... Although not cited in the article, these are extremely similar the field flux knots which Wilczek looked for.
...

Can you help us locate the relevant journal article(s) by Wilczek?

btw I see the (December 2009) Finkelstein paper which you call attention to here has a link to an earlier (January 2009) Finkelstein paper. I'll check that to see if it has references to related work.
http://arxiv.org/abs/0901.1687
Colored Preons
Robert J. Finkelstein
10 pages, 4 Tables
(Submitted on 12 Jan 2009)
"Previous studies have suggested complementary models of the elementary particles as (a) quantum knots and (b) preonic nuclei that are field and particle descriptions, respectively, of the same particles. This earlier work, carried out in the context of standard electroweak (SU(2) x U(1)) physics, is here extended to the strong interactions by the introduction of color (SU(3)) charges."

No, unfortunately. The January paper only has 4 references, all to papers by Finkelstein. One of those cited is this:
http://arxiv.org/abs/0806.3105
Knots and Preons
Robert J. Finkelstein
12 pages; 4 tables
(Submitted on 18 Jun 2008)
"It is shown that the four trefoil solitons that are described by the irreducible representations D3/2mm' of the quantum algebra SLq(2) (and that may be identified with the four families of elementary fermions [tex](e,\mu,\tau;\nu_e\nu_\mu\nu_\tau;d,s,b;u,c,t)[/tex] may be built out of three preons, chosen from two charged preons with charges (1/3,-1/3) and two neutral preons. These preons are Lorentz spinors and are described by the D1/2mm' representation of SLq(2). There are also four bosonic preons described by the D1mm' and D000 representations of SLq(2). The knotted standard theory may be replicated at the preon level and the conjectured particles are in principle indirectly observable."

Again, this June 2008 Finkelstein has very few references, only three, which are other Finkelsteins. The author does not seems to want to indicate how his work relates to that of other people.

It's curious. By contrast, Bilson-Thompson, in his 2005 braid preon paper http://arxiv.org/pdf/hep-ph/0503213 , went to some length to point out the relationship to earlier work. Subsequent braid matter papers by Sundance and others have done likewise. Robert Finkelstein appears exceptional in only citing his own work.
 
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  • #5


marcus said:
Can you help us locate the relevant journal article(s) by Wilczek?
This is the one:

http://arxiv.org/abs/0812.5097

New Kinds of Quantum Statistics

Frank Wilczek
(Submitted on 30 Dec 2008 (v1), last revised 26 Jan 2009 (this version, v3))
I review the quantum kinematics of identical particles, which suggests new possibilities, beyond bosons and fermions, in 2+1 dimensions; and how simple flux-charge constructions embody the new possibilities, leading to both abelian and nonabelian anyons. I briefly allude to experimental realizations, and also advertise a spinor construction of nonabelian statistics, that has a 3+1 dimensional extension.

If you look else where, non abelian anyons are described by quantum groups, for example:

http://quantum.leeds.ac.uk/~phyjkp/TQC_Review.pdf

And notice that q-algebras, as Robert Finkelstein used, is a quantum group.


But it is indeed really weird that he didn't try to connect to other people. It wouldn't be that hard...
 
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Related to The SM finaly realized as particles w/o particle .

1. What does "The SM finally realized as particles w/o particle" mean?

The Standard Model (SM) is a theory that describes the fundamental particles and interactions in our universe. This phrase means that the SM has been shown to accurately describe the behavior of particles without the need for an additional "particle" to explain their behavior.

2. Why is this discovery significant?

This discovery is significant because it confirms the completeness and accuracy of the Standard Model, which has been a major goal in particle physics for decades. It also has implications for future research and potential new discoveries.

3. How was this discovery made?

This discovery was made through experiments, observations, and mathematical calculations by particle physicists. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN played a crucial role in providing evidence for the existence of these particles and their properties.

4. What are the implications of this discovery?

This discovery has implications for our understanding of the fundamental building blocks of our universe and their interactions. It also has potential applications in fields such as technology, medicine, and energy production.

5. What is the difference between particles with and without mass?

Particles with mass have a property known as "inertia," which makes them resistant to changes in motion. Particles without mass, such as photons, do not have this property and can travel at the speed of light. The discovery of particles without mass in the Standard Model helps to explain the behavior of massless particles and their role in the universe.

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