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Stargazing The Sun today - 9 July 2017 - nice spot group

  1. Jul 8, 2017 #1

    davenn

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    AR2665 ... largest spot group for some time
    Canon 6D, 800mm, f11, 125th, ISO100 ( the 800mm is a 100-400mm L lens with a x2 teleconverter)
    With my eyesight going downhill, I have really been struggling of late to be able to get sharp manual focus 1f641.png

    IMG_0914sm.jpg

    IMG_0914-2sm.jpg


    Dave
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 9, 2017 #2
    Wow! If it's there tomorrow (I assume) I'll try to look at it myself. ...
     
  4. Jul 9, 2017 #3

    davenn

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    the largest spot in that group is about the size of Jupiter
     
  5. Jul 9, 2017 #4
    Amazing! I also magnified your second image on my screen and it looks like a mole on a human skin! :nb)
     
  6. Jul 9, 2017 #5

    davenn

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    yes it does
     
  7. Jul 12, 2017 #6
    I got swamped these days and didn't get the chance to see it. But I'm still happy with your pictures. Any idea if it produced solar flares this time? (there was a high chance, I think)

    As far as I know region 2665 is still active today wed July 12, 2017. I may still get a chance to see it. I think it's worth it!

    Here is a 'live update' etc. ... :
    https://www.spaceweatherlive.com/en/solar-activity/sunspot-regions
     
  8. Jul 12, 2017 #7

    davenn

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    a M 1.2 a couple of days ago
     
  9. Jul 12, 2017 #8
    Ok thanks!
     
  10. Jul 12, 2017 #9

    Andy Resnick

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    3 straight days of 100% overcast skies here....

    I empathize with the difficulty of manual focusing- but that may not be the problem here. Was your lens set to 400/11, meaning the final configuration was 800/22? That tiny f/# is sufficient to make diffraction noticeable. And, based on my experience in (now) swampy Cleveland, 1/125s exposure time can still allow seeing effects to occur if the atmosphere is especially active.
     
  11. Jul 12, 2017 #10
  12. Jul 12, 2017 #11

    davenn

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    400 @f5.6 = 800 @ f11 :smile:
     
  13. Jul 12, 2017 #12

    davenn

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    Note; there was a G1 Geo storm conditions last sunday/monday, but that was due to the coronal hole
    people far enough north ( nthrn hemisphere), or south in the southern hemisphere did image some aurora
    but it was difficult due to the full mood at that time
     
  14. Jul 13, 2017 #13

    russ_watters

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    Awesome pix! It's been a down year for sunspots.
    The trouble with sunspots is that they aren't sharply focused objects, which makes them hard to focus on.
     
  15. Jul 13, 2017 #14
    It's even visible with naked eye, solar glasses of course ! Just got the chance to see it ...
     
  16. Jul 13, 2017 #15

    davenn

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    thanks Russ I appreciate your comments :smile: ... yes, the sun is heading deeper into solar minimum.

    well ..... to an extent, yes ... tho I am seeing others do sharper images than me with just single exposure photos ( not stacked)
    so the 3 main variables are .....
    1) .... I'm seriously struggling focussing on the finer details ... be it photography, reading, my electronics at work
    2) .... the quality of my solar filter compared to what others are using ( my camera and lens is top end stuff)
    3) .... stable/unstable atmosphere

    here's a random one pulled off a facebook astro forum ....

    19990182_1289252017850610_4185664567419624235_n.jpg


    Rex I. De SilvaSingle Frame Astrophotography

    My image of sunspot AR2665 captured 11th July. Coolpix L27 point & shoot digital camera and vintage Asahi Pentax 40mm spyglass with AstroSolar filter. Edited with ACDSee 15.

    really crisp

    I could show ones worse than mine, but I wont :biggrin:
    mine isn't bad, I just feel that I could do a lot better


    Dave
     
  17. Jul 14, 2017 #16
  18. Jul 14, 2017 #17

    OmCheeto

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    "Naked eye"?
    Are you some kind of human-falcon hybrid?
    My camera could just barely make it out.


    2017.07.14.sun.spot.fuji.camera.76x.zoom.png
    Just above the "1" in "16:23"
    36x optical zoom

    It may be a speck of dust on the lens, but I don't care. I'm calling it a sunspot.
     
  19. Jul 14, 2017 #18
    You're late! I think it's winding down now:
    https://www.spaceweatherlive.com/en/solar-activity/sunspot-regions

    When I saw it it was still about the size of Jupiter (I caught it on the verge ...). So no need to have a falcon eye. It was expected (to be visible by "naked eye").

    If I can still see it today (meaning tomorrow July 15) (with just the solar glasses) I'll probably change my profile name ... to "falcon" ...:biggrin:
     
  20. Jul 15, 2017 #19
    Just did! Just a tiny tiny dot though, only because I knew where to look. [Still keeping my profile name though!]
    With binos and telescope it was still clear of course, but I'm not too much into cameras (other than cell phones) ...
    It will be setting towards the non-visible side soon anyway (couple of days, I assume), so anyone wanting to test their eye vision and/or their instruments must act fast (i.e. now) ...
     
  21. Jul 15, 2017 #20

    OmCheeto

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    I tried it with binoculars(7x50) yesterday, and couldn't hold them steady enough.
    I may try it today with my new/old 3" reflecting telescope. But I haven't figured out how to capture images through it yet.
    And it's been reduced from an interesting "spot" and "trailing" stuff combination, from when @davenn first posted, to merely a single spot.
    Which is not really that interesting.
    As my sister posted regarding my image on Facebook yesterday; "I think it's an 'ant' on the lens"
    :oldgrumpy:
     
  22. Jul 15, 2017 #21
    I agree, it's just a small common spot by now, barely intetesting, except for visibility tests. Binoculars have that stability problem. I use 12×30 (handy and small, I carry them with me, especially when I'm travelling, good for fast observations - but you'll be surprised, I can even see the horse head nebula with those, saturn's ring(s), double stars etc.). With 7×50 that kind of spots don't look interesting at all, neither (almost) with the 12×30. Telescopes, even small ones, are better and much more stable of course.
     
  23. Jul 16, 2017 #22

    davenn

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    ye but it still had a sting in it's tail !! .... produced a M2.4 flare a couple of days ago 14th July and those effects have just hit earth over the last 3 hours
    the prelude to more aurora activity :smile:


    Dave
     
  24. Jul 16, 2017 #23
    So it did it again! didn't it? ...
    https://www.spaceweatherlive.com/en/news/view/286/20170714-eruptive-m24-solar-flare

    "G1 - Minor geomagnetic storm expected
    The observed Kp index is 4+ but the predicted K-indice of 5- indicates that stronger geomagnetic conditions might occur at this moment.
    "

    "Current data suggest that it is not possible to see aurora now at middle latitudes"

    For higher latitudes high 75% chance of severe aurora activity, at the moment.

    Predicted Kp index max 6, for all latitudes.

    For aurora and Kp index forecast:
    https://www.spaceweatherlive.com/en/auroral-activity/aurora-forecast

    Note: Even several doctors, neurologists etc. follow up with such sites, as the Kp index seems to also play a role in affecting at least some neural phenomena.
     
  25. Jul 16, 2017 #24

    OmCheeto

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    I saw that! With my new/old telescope.

    Yesterday, while putting together the solar filter, I had to stop and laugh, as it reminded me of that old saying; "All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten".
    1. Black craft paper
    2. cardboard
    3. tape
    4. scissors
    5. crayon
    6. ruler​

    2017.07.15.saw.a.sunspot.through.a.telescope.png
    Originally a "tracking" telescope: Bushnell North Star, 76mm, reflector, model 78-8831.
    Currently a manual everything telescope. The electronics have died.
    Hence, my friend gave it to me for free.
    But good enough to see the sunspot, with (de)tails!
    I doubt I will be able to duct tape any of my cameras to it, so I may look into buying a dedicated telescope camera sensor thingy. And maybe try and fix the electronics. Might be just a loose power wire. If not, it'll stay manual.

    ps. I've been monitoring the spot online at the NASA SDO site, just to make sure it's not an ant on my lens.
     
  26. Jul 18, 2017 #25
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