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Stargazing The Sun today - 9 July 2017 - nice spot group

  1. Jul 15, 2017 #21
    I agree, it's just a small common spot by now, barely intetesting, except for visibility tests. Binoculars have that stability problem. I use 12×30 (handy and small, I carry them with me, especially when I'm travelling, good for fast observations - but you'll be surprised, I can even see the horse head nebula with those, saturn's ring(s), double stars etc.). With 7×50 that kind of spots don't look interesting at all, neither (almost) with the 12×30. Telescopes, even small ones, are better and much more stable of course.
     
  2. Jul 16, 2017 #22

    davenn

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    ye but it still had a sting in it's tail !! .... produced a M2.4 flare a couple of days ago 14th July and those effects have just hit earth over the last 3 hours
    the prelude to more aurora activity :smile:


    Dave
     
  3. Jul 16, 2017 #23
    So it did it again! didn't it? ...
    https://www.spaceweatherlive.com/en/news/view/286/20170714-eruptive-m24-solar-flare

    "G1 - Minor geomagnetic storm expected
    The observed Kp index is 4+ but the predicted K-indice of 5- indicates that stronger geomagnetic conditions might occur at this moment.
    "

    "Current data suggest that it is not possible to see aurora now at middle latitudes"

    For higher latitudes high 75% chance of severe aurora activity, at the moment.

    Predicted Kp index max 6, for all latitudes.

    For aurora and Kp index forecast:
    https://www.spaceweatherlive.com/en/auroral-activity/aurora-forecast

    Note: Even several doctors, neurologists etc. follow up with such sites, as the Kp index seems to also play a role in affecting at least some neural phenomena.
     
  4. Jul 16, 2017 #24

    OmCheeto

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    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    I saw that! With my new/old telescope.

    Yesterday, while putting together the solar filter, I had to stop and laugh, as it reminded me of that old saying; "All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten".
    1. Black craft paper
    2. cardboard
    3. tape
    4. scissors
    5. crayon
    6. ruler​

    2017.07.15.saw.a.sunspot.through.a.telescope.png
    Originally a "tracking" telescope: Bushnell North Star, 76mm, reflector, model 78-8831.
    Currently a manual everything telescope. The electronics have died.
    Hence, my friend gave it to me for free.
    But good enough to see the sunspot, with (de)tails!
    I doubt I will be able to duct tape any of my cameras to it, so I may look into buying a dedicated telescope camera sensor thingy. And maybe try and fix the electronics. Might be just a loose power wire. If not, it'll stay manual.

    ps. I've been monitoring the spot online at the NASA SDO site, just to make sure it's not an ant on my lens.
     
  5. Jul 18, 2017 #25
  6. Aug 1, 2017 #26
  7. Aug 4, 2017 #27
    Now it looks like it's been renamed as region 2670 (≥ Aug. 2), with no promising and faded activity, and almost down for the count (at least for now):
    https://www.spaceweatherlive.com/en/news/view/291/20170802-sunspot-region-2670

    Here is a brief update/review on its history (from the above link):

    "
    logo.png
    Sunspot region 2670

    Wednesday, 2 August 2017 - 16:49 UTC

    291-header.jpg

    Old sunspot region 2665 which caused a couple of large far side eruptions has now rotated back onto the earth-facing solar disk. It has received sunspot region number 2670 from the NOAA SWPC. Due to the activity this sunspot region displayed while it was on the far side, hopes were high for its return. So what is left of this group and should we expect more solar flares?

    Well... no. We are looking at a sunspot region that was likely much larger on the far side and it has decayed a lot the past week or so. We only see two sunspots at the moment and an enormous amount of faculae. Faculae are bright areas that form when sunspot regions decay so it tells us something about this region's history. Sunspot region 2670 has a lot of faculae surrounding the two spots (see our header image made using the white light SDO/HMI image) which is a sign that this group used to be much larger and has decayed significantly.

    Also worth nothing is that the region produced no major coronal mass ejections since 28 July so it is pretty safe to say that this region is down for the count. At least for now. It can regrow new spots so we shouldn't rule out the region completely but for now the chance that we are getting a strong solar flare from this region seems very low.
    "

    However, active geomagnetic conditions since yesterday (Aug. 3), with Kp 4:
    https://www.spaceweatherlive.com/en/auroral-activity/the-kp-index

    What will happen by eclipse time? (a few days away)
     
  8. Aug 12, 2017 #28
    Currently (Aug. 12, 2017, ~10pm EST, US (DST) ), from:
    https://www.spaceweatherlive.com/en/solar-activity/sunspot-regions
    logo.png
    Sunspot regions

    On this page you'll find an overview of all the visible sunspot regions on the Sun together with their properties, images and the chances on solar flares or proton events. This page is updated daily and the sunspot images every hour.

    SDO_HMIIF_512.jpg

    Region 2670
    Number of
    sunspots
    Size Class Magn. Class Spot Location
    1 100 -10 HSX S07W72
    2670_HMIIF.jpg 2670_HMIBC.jpg

    So it's bye bye baby! ... This is almost the last we'll be seing of it! So hurry for last minute final observations and ... camera, bino, telescope and eye tests ... . However, "falcon eye" won't work this time! ... Not a chance! (I even tried it on the previous post and it was already barely on the limit back then.)
     
  9. Aug 14, 2017 #29
    New one!:
    logo.png
    Sunspot regions

    On this page you'll find an overview of all the visible sunspot regions on the Sun together with their properties, images and the chances on solar flares or proton events. This page is updated daily and the sunspot images every hour.

    SDO_HMIIF_512.jpg

    Region 2671 New
    ...

    ...

    https://www.spaceweatherlive.com/en/solar-activity/sunspot-regions


    Right on time(?), perhaps for the eclipse, to have something under totality. We'll see ...
    It's producing flares too! ...
    Check out:
    https://www.spaceweatherlive.com/en/news/view/294/20170814-coronal-hole-faces-earth

    And cool flare video here (If only the eclipse was today!!):
    https://www.spaceweatherlive.com/en...14-new-active-region-producing-c-class-flares
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2017
  10. Aug 16, 2017 #30
    Region 2671 turned into an interesting group:
    (currently [Wed. Aug 16, 2017 (~12pm EST, DST)] from https://www.spaceweatherlive.com/en/solar-activity/sunspot-regions)

    "
    logo.png
    Sunspot regions

    On this page you'll find an overview of all the visible sunspot regions on the Sun together with their properties, images and the chances on solar flares or proton events. This page is updated daily and the sunspot images every hour.

    SDO_HMIIF_512.jpg

    Region 2671
    Number of
    sunspots
    Size Class Magn. Class Spot Location

    11 9 170 100 EAI N10E53
    2671_HMIIF.jpg 2671_HMIBC.jpg
    Flare probabilities
    C M X Proton
    40% 10% 1% 1%
    Solar flares from today
    B2.8 B3.7 B2.4 B5.2 B3.6
    Back to top

    Current data suggest that it is not possible to see aurora now at middle latitudes

    Latest news

    294-thumb.jpg
    Monday, 14 August 2017 - 18:56 UTC
    Coronal hole faces Earth

    293-thumb.jpg
    Monday, 14 August 2017 - 13:21 UTC
    New active region producing C-class flares


    More news
    Today's space weather
    Auroral activity Minor Severe
    High latitude 25% 55%
    Middle latitude 15% 5%
    Predicted Kp max 4
    Aurora forecast HelpMore data
    Solar activity
    M-class solar flare 10%
    X-class solar flare 1%
    B2.8 B3.7 B2.4 B5.2 B3.6
    Sunspot regionsMore data
    Moon phase
    Last Quarter "

    Also, minor G1 geomagnetic storm is expected to reach earth tomorrow Thu, due to the initial flare last Mon.
     
  11. Aug 16, 2017 #31

    russ_watters

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    Staff: Mentor

    Oh, awesome - this will help with focus and give something else to look at during partial.
     
  12. Aug 16, 2017 #32
    Indeed!
     
  13. Aug 16, 2017 #33

    davenn

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    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    actually, no, that isn't the reason :smile:
    the predicted auroral activity for the 16th and 17th will be due to the huge coronal hole that became geo-effective 2-3 days ago

    ch.JPG


    cheers
    Dave
     
  14. Aug 16, 2017 #34
    You're right of course. My mistake. Thanks for correcting.

    "
    logo.png
    Coronal hole faces Earth

    Monday, 14 August 2017 - 18:56 UTC

    294-header.jpg

    A southern extension of the northern hemisphere polar coronal hole is now facing Earth. It extended far enough towards the south to trigger our automated coronal hole detection system.

    It is hard to say how much of the coronal hole solar wind stream is going to arrive at Earth but the NOAA SWPC believes we will see the solar wind stream at our planet as they issued a minor G1 geomagnetic storm watch for this Thursday which would be 17 August, 2017."

    Source: https://www.spaceweatherlive.com/en/news/view/294/20170814-coronal-hole-faces-earth

    The solar wind is expected to arrive today Thu Aug. 17, 2017. To monitor and for updates see also:
    https://www.spaceweatherlive.com/

    http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/
     
  15. Aug 17, 2017 #35
  16. Aug 21, 2017 #36
    Another (2nd) sun spot group has just rotated into view (right on time for the eclipse), region 2672. So currently there are two groups: 2671, 2672.
    SDO_HMIIF_512.jpg

    That and more might make the eclipse today more interesting! For more details see e.g.

    https://www.physicsforums.com/threads/u-s-solar-eclipse-of-aug-21-2017.866521/page-15#post-5825228

    https://www.physicsforums.com/threads/u-s-solar-eclipse-of-aug-21-2017.866521/page-16#post-5825230

    Note: further updates of solar activity will continue on a separate thread, coming up.
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2017
  17. Aug 21, 2017 #37

    Andy Resnick

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    2016 Award

    Acquired this image yesterday during equipment check-out for today (Monday). IIRC, 800/8, 1/125s ISO 200, using an ND 6 filter.

    aDSC_8659_zpskpxgckov.jpg
     
  18. Aug 27, 2017 #38
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