Thermodynamics-Net heat absorbed?

In summary, net heat absorbed is the amount of heat that is transferred to an object during a process, taking into account both the heat added and the work done on the object. In an isometric process, where no work is done, net heat absorbed can be calculated using the equation Q=nCvdeltaT.
  • #1
Urth
1
0
Can someone define what net heat absorbed is. I'm taking physics 1 right now, and am not sure exactly what it is. We just learned the first law of thermodynamics, and one of the questions on the homework is asking us to find the net heat absorbed in an isometric process. I just have no idea what that means...is it just like what Q is, since W=0? I just used the equations for Q, being nCvdeltaT, but I'm not sure.

Any help would be appreciated.
 
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  • #2
Urth said:
Can someone define what net heat absorbed is. I'm taking physics 1 right now, and am not sure exactly what it is. We just learned the first law of thermodynamics, and one of the questions on the homework is asking us to find the net heat absorbed in an isometric process. I just have no idea what that means...is it just like what Q is, since W=0? I just used the equations for Q, being nCvdeltaT, but I'm not sure.

Any help would be appreciated.
It is Q. Heat is the name given to energy transfer to or from an object when it is in contact with something else at a different temperature. You can make an object warmer (raise its temperature and internal energy) by adding heat, or by doing work.
 
  • #3


Sure, I would be happy to provide some clarification on the concept of net heat absorbed. Net heat absorbed refers to the overall amount of heat energy that is transferred into a system during a process. This can be calculated by considering the difference between the heat energy transferred into the system and the heat energy transferred out of the system.

In the context of the first law of thermodynamics, which states that energy cannot be created or destroyed but can only be transferred or converted from one form to another, the net heat absorbed is an important factor to consider in understanding the changes in a system's internal energy.

In an isometric process, which is a process that occurs at a constant volume, the work done by the system is equal to zero, as you correctly stated. This means that the change in internal energy is solely determined by the heat energy transferred into the system. Therefore, in this case, the net heat absorbed is equal to the change in internal energy.

To calculate the net heat absorbed in an isometric process, you can use the equation Q = nCvΔT, where Q is the net heat absorbed, n is the number of moles of the gas, Cv is the molar specific heat at constant volume, and ΔT is the change in temperature. This equation takes into account the amount of heat energy required to raise the temperature of the gas at a constant volume.

I hope this helps to clarify the concept of net heat absorbed. If you have any further questions, please don't hesitate to ask. Good luck with your studies in physics!
 

1. What is "net heat absorbed" in thermodynamics?

In thermodynamics, "net heat absorbed" refers to the overall amount of heat energy that is gained or lost by a system during a physical or chemical process. It takes into account both the heat that is added to the system and the heat that is lost from the system.

2. How is net heat absorbed calculated in thermodynamics?

The net heat absorbed in thermodynamics can be calculated through the first law of thermodynamics, which states that the change in internal energy of a system is equal to the heat added to the system minus the work done by the system. This can be represented by the equation ΔU = Q - W, where ΔU is the change in internal energy, Q is the heat added, and W is the work done.

3. What factors affect the net heat absorbed in a system?

The amount of net heat absorbed in a system is influenced by several factors, including the initial and final temperatures of the system, the specific heat capacity of the materials involved, and the amount of energy transferred through work. Other factors such as the type of process (isothermal, adiabatic, etc.) and the type of system (open, closed, isolated) also play a role.

4. How does the concept of "net heat absorbed" relate to the second law of thermodynamics?

The second law of thermodynamics states that in any spontaneous process, the total entropy of the universe will always increase. This means that in the transfer of heat, some of the energy will always be lost as heat energy, resulting in a decrease in the system's ability to do work. Therefore, the net heat absorbed by a system will always be less than the total heat added, in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

5. Can the net heat absorbed by a system ever be negative?

Yes, the net heat absorbed by a system can be negative. This occurs when the heat lost by the system is greater than the heat gained, resulting in a negative value for net heat absorbed. In this case, the system is giving off more heat than it is absorbing, and its internal energy decreases as a result.

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