Torque required to rotate an object at an angle

  • Thread starter jhogue74
  • Start date
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I am trying to work out the torque required to rotate a platform, initially declined at an angle. See attached hand sketch.
My situation is
- I have a platform initially at a declined angle, say at 0 degrees.
- I have a load at the end of the platform at 0 degrees
- I want to be able to rotate the platform and load 180 degrees from its initial position
- I am ignoring the platform self weight at the moment for simplicity

My thoughts are that the torque required is related to the amount of work required to lift the load F from point 1 to point 2, for now ignoring efficiencies of components etc. The final torque required will be based on the slew ring I choose to allow the circular movement.

Could anyone give me their thoughts on my situation. Trying to work my way through what loads/forces are to be considered and then resolving this back to a torque at the drive motor.

Thanks,

Jason
 

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BvU

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Hello jhogue, ##\quad## :welcome: ##\quad## !

torque in your scenario depends on how far the platform has rotated: it's 0 at 0 and 180 degrees and maximum at 90.

At that point you have an opposing torque ##\ F\sin(85) \ ## times the distance between load and axis.

I don't understand what a slew ring is or what it is supposed to do.
 

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