Two or more different equipotential surfaces to intersect?

In summary, the conversation discusses two questions about electric field and equipotential surface. The first question is whether it is possible to find two points, not at infinity, where the electric field is equal to zero. The answer to this question is yes, according to the person responding. However, they are not sure why and suggest asking a homework helper for further clarification. The second question is whether it is possible for two or more different equipotential surfaces to intersect, but this is not explicitly answered in the conversation.
  • #1
soul
62
0
I have two questions about electric field and equipotential surface. Here is first one:
For an arrangement of two point charges,
--Is it possible to find two points (neither at infinity) where E = 0 ?
Secondly,
--Is it possible for two or more different equipotential surfaces to intersect?
 
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  • #2
the first question's answer is yes, it is possible.
 
  • #3
Could you explain further, please? To understand it, "yes" is not sufficient.
 
  • #4
Oh I am really sorry, I was just trying to help. See i am not a homework helper, i am just a regular student so I am not really sure why that is the answer either, but my teacher taught this to us and said that there can be two points where E= 0. but you should continue asking homework helpers for help. they can really explain things to you better and answer the question "why". haha I am sorry I am not much of a help.
 

Related to Two or more different equipotential surfaces to intersect?

1. What are equipotential surfaces?

Equipotential surfaces are imaginary surfaces in space where all points have the same potential. This means that if an object is moved along an equipotential surface, it will experience the same amount of work regardless of its position.

2. Can two or more different equipotential surfaces intersect?

Yes, it is possible for two or more different equipotential surfaces to intersect. This happens when there are multiple sources of potential in the same space, causing the equipotential surfaces to overlap.

3. How do you determine the direction of the electric field at the point of intersection?

The electric field at the point of intersection is perpendicular to the equipotential surfaces. This means that the direction of the electric field can be determined by drawing a tangent line to the equipotential surfaces at the point of intersection.

4. What happens when two equipotential surfaces with different potentials intersect?

When two equipotential surfaces with different potentials intersect, it means that there are two sources of potential in the same space. This can happen in situations such as a parallel plate capacitor, where the two plates have different potentials.

5. Are equipotential surfaces always spherical?

No, equipotential surfaces can take on various shapes depending on the distribution of charge or potential in the space. While some may be spherical, others can be cylindrical, planar, or irregularly shaped.

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