Can E=V/d be used to calculate the electric field of a dipole?

In summary, the conversation discusses determining the magnitude of the electric field between equipotential lines and pins in a dipole. The homework equations are mentioned, and it is questioned if E=V/d can be used for all cases. However, it is noted that this equation only works if the field is uniform, which is not the case for a dipole. A more accurate value for the electric field can be obtained by using a smaller distance between prongs.
  • #1
LostThoughts
This is from a lab where my team found the equipotential lines from the electric field of a dipole. The information I was given to calculate the magnitude of the electric field seems too simple, and for some reason I'm expecting this to be more complex. So, this is my attempt at double checking. Can E=V/d be used for all of this?

1. Homework Statement

Determine the magnitude of the average electric field between two sets equipotential lines.
0.5v to 1v d=0.022m
5v to 5.5v d=0.022m

Determine the magnitude of the average electric field between the two pins.
pinnegative=0v pinpositive=6v d=0.087m

Determine the magnitude of the average electric field between one pin and each equipotential line.
V=2v d=0.035m
V=3v d=0.042m
V=4v d=0.057m
V=5v d=0.069m

Homework Equations


E=F/q V=W/q W=Fd E=V/d
 
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  • #2
LostThoughts said:
Can E=V/d be used for all of this?
This is correct only if the field is uniform. The electric field generated by a dipole is not uniform. If you measure the potential difference ΔV in a direction perpendicular to a given equipotential, the electric field at that general point is approximately given by E = ΔV/Δx, where Δx is the distance over which you measured the potential difference. The smaller you make Δx, the more accurate your value for E. In your case you probably used a two-prong connector with about 1 cm separation between prongs, so you have no control over that.
 

Related to Can E=V/d be used to calculate the electric field of a dipole?

1. What is a dipole electric field?

A dipole electric field is a type of electric field that is created by two equal and opposite electric charges that are separated by a small distance. This creates a field with a positive side and a negative side, with the direction of the field pointing from the positive to the negative charge.

2. How is a dipole electric field different from a uniform electric field?

While a uniform electric field has a constant strength and direction throughout, a dipole electric field has varying strength and direction depending on the distance from the charges. It also has a net electric field of zero at the center of the dipole, unlike a uniform electric field.

3. What is the equation for the strength of a dipole electric field?

The strength of a dipole electric field can be calculated using the equation E = kq/r^2, where E is the strength of the electric field, k is the Coulomb's constant, q is the magnitude of the electric charge, and r is the distance between the charges.

4. How does the distance between the charges affect the strength of a dipole electric field?

The strength of a dipole electric field is inversely proportional to the square of the distance between the charges. This means that as the distance between the charges increases, the strength of the electric field decreases.

5. What are some real-life examples of dipole electric fields?

Some examples of dipole electric fields in real life include water molecules, which have a positive and negative side due to the separation of the oxygen and hydrogen atoms, and magnets, which have a north and south pole with opposite charges that create a dipole electric field.

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