Typographical question (equation numbers)

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In summary, the conversation discusses the capitalization of "equation" when referring to a specific numbered equation in a text. The speaker mentions their personal preference of not using "equation" and the potential argument for always capitalizing it. They also raise the question of whether using "Dispersion Equation (12)" makes it seem like there were 11 previous numbered dispersion equations. The conversation concludes with a suggestion to use "the dispersion equation (12)" based on a style guide example. There is also a brief mention of having two names for the same thing, "Equation 12" and "the dispersion equation."
  • #1
nomadreid
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This is just an editing, not a conceptual, question. (Hence I don't put it in the other forums.) In a text, when one refers to a particular equation by number, as in "we see in Equation (12) that...", the "equation" is capitalized (upper case). When it is not named, of course, not :"we see in the equation below that..." However, what does one do in the following cases?
"we see in the dispersion equation (12) that...", "we see in the continuity equation (12) that...".
"dispersion Equation (12)" "Dispersion Equation (12)" "Dispersion equation (12)", "dispersion equation (12)"
(similarly for continuity...)
Thanks
 
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  • #2
nomadreid said:
In a text, when one refers to a particular equation by number, as in "we see in Equation (12) that...", the "equation" is capitalized (upper case).
Usually I write just the number (without any "equation" or "Equation"), but it is a matter of preference, and possible journal requirements.
nomadreid said:
However, what does one do in the following cases?
"we see in the dispersion equation (12) that...", "we see in the continuity equation (12) that...".
"dispersion Equation (12)" "Dispersion Equation (12)" "Dispersion equation (12)", "dispersion equation (12)"
(similarly for continuity...)
Following my own style, I would write "dispersion equation (12)", but since you always capitalize "Equation" anyway, I think in your case one could argue for "Dispersion Equation (12)".
 
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  • #3
Thanks, S.G. Janssens. I am wondering: doesn't "Dispersion Equation (12)" make it sound as if there had been 11 other numbered dispersion equations before that (rather than 11 other types of equations)?
 
  • #4
Equation 12 is a proper noun.
The dispersion equation (12) is not.
 
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  • #5
The capitalization in itself is a question of style. Taking as an example Physical Review, in the style guide one can find the following example:
FIG. 1. Continuous line: solution of the Lippmann-Schwinger equation (13) with the use of dynamical self-energy of Eq. (5). Broken line: static Coulomb wave function given by Eq. (9) of the text.
so I would use "the dispersion equation (12)."
 
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  • #6
How about "...we see in the dispersion equation (Equation 12) ..."
or
".. we see in Equation 12 (the dispersion equation)..."

Edit
I think the root problem is, you have two "names" for the same thing:
  • Equation 12
  • the dispersion equation
 
  • #7
I find the idea of "Equation 12" being a proper noun to be a bit weird, but it does seem reasonable that "the dispersion equation" is not a proper noun, since it has the word "the" in it and hence is not actually a name.

For example if you were picking people for teams, you would never say "I pick the Emily" even if there was only one Emily.
 
  • #8
OTOH, I knew a guy in the UK, who would talk about going to the Gambia (country in Africa).
I live in the US.
The bolded words are all proper nouns.
 
  • #9
Would write 'dispersion equation (Equation 12)' the 'dispersion equation' is the name and (Equation 12) is the reference
 

Related to Typographical question (equation numbers)

1. What is a typographical question and how does it relate to equation numbers?

A typographical question is a question related to the design and arrangement of written or printed material. In the context of equation numbers, it refers to the placement, style, and format of the numbers used to label equations in a document.

2. What are some common ways to format equation numbers in a document?

Some common ways to format equation numbers include using Arabic numerals (1, 2, 3...), Roman numerals (I, II, III...), or letters (a, b, c...). They can also be formatted as subscripts or superscripts.

3. How can I customize the appearance of equation numbers in my document?

Depending on the document editing software you are using, there may be specific options or settings to customize the appearance of equation numbers. This can include changing the font, size, color, or position of the numbers.

4. Are there any guidelines for numbering equations in a document?

Yes, there are some general guidelines for numbering equations in a document. It is recommended to number equations sequentially and consistently throughout the document, as well as to use a clear and concise labeling system.

5. Can equation numbers be automatically generated in a document?

Yes, some document editing software has the ability to automatically generate and update equation numbers. This can be useful when making changes or adding new equations to a document, as it ensures the numbering remains accurate and consistent.

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