Stargazing U.S. Solar Eclipse of Aug. 21, 2017

  • Thread starter Borg
  • Start date
  • Featured

russ_watters

Mentor
18,504
4,719
This was kind of my "take away" from the last two years of listening to veterans of eclipses; "When in doubt, just stare at it. Do NOT mess with your camera."
In my research, I found a wonderful program called Eclipse Orchestrator, which automated the imaging completely. I only had to touch the camera for a mid eclipse focus check and occasional recentering of the telescope (And yank off the filters when prompted).

Unfortunately that didn't work for my astrocam, so i wrote a couple of scripts in Maximdl, one for partial and one for totality. I just had to hit "start" at the appropriate time.
 

OmCheeto

Gold Member
2,023
2,366
@OmCheeto , how did the travels to/from the event, and the crowding in Oregon turn out?
I can only describe the second of the "two trips" as "serendipitous".

[on topic]
The pretty much "zero" traffic for the 200 mile drive to my eclipse site, starting at 2 pm on Sunday, was a great relief.
[/on topic]

[off topic]
The "for most people" nightmarish trip back, was a complete, and utter delight. Driving at 3 miles per hour, for 2 hours, through the canyons of Central Oregon, made me want to move there.
[/off topic]
 

OmCheeto

Gold Member
2,023
2,366
Forgot to add this one my wife took of me trying to line up the camera to take the total eclipse photo.View attachment 209521
In the upper left corner, you can see some of the fog that was to the West of us. It threatened to blow in a couple of times but held off.
I am willing to pay $50 for a full sized (8½ x 11 glossy) print of that image.

:oldlove:
 

Borg

Science Advisor
Gold Member
1,818
2,029
This was my simple setup in South Carolina.
0821171431b.jpg


Here is the beast that almost ruined my viewing ten minutes before totality. Hard to believe that it completely evaporated in 10 minutes.
0821171420.jpg


My wife had to stay behind in northern VA but she had glasses with her. I didn't expect her to get any decent pictures but she is pretty resourceful. Who needs solar filters when you have just the right amount of water for a filter?

20170821_144035.jpg
 
952
161
This was kind of my "take away" from the last two years of listening to veterans of eclipses; "When in doubt, just stare at it. Do NOT mess with your camera."
Essentially what I did. I was a bit annoyed that the Sun's corona looked too thick. But then again, I used a mass-market point-and-shoot digital camera. I would have to have experimented with its settings to try to get a better shot, but I didn't bother.
 

anorlunda

Mentor
Insights Author
Gold Member
6,540
3,596
Here is the beast that almost ruined my viewing ten minutes before totality. Hard to believe that it completely evaporated in 10 minutes.
OMG I would have been tearing my hair out at that point. I actually had a dream the night before that a little black cloud would come along at just the wrong time to spoil my view.

Glad that it cleared up for you.
 

anorlunda

Mentor
Insights Author
Gold Member
6,540
3,596
Nice. Is the blueish coloration an artifact of processing, or in some sense real?
Wow, visual effects abound. During lunar eclipses, the moon looks red. It is illuminated by the annular red sunrise /sunset light from Earth's atmosphere. During a solar eclipse, the moon should show a reflection of the big blue marble. Can that be correct?
 

Borg

Science Advisor
Gold Member
1,818
2,029
OMG I would have been tearing my hair out at that point.
Yes, I was definitely tearing out my hair and thinking whether I could throw my equipment into the back of a truck and race after a clear spot in two minutes. Fortunately, patience and a little luck won out.
 
111
66
I didn't get any pictures that are worth sharing, but the viewing in Makanda Ill was PERFECT, even if the temperature was almost unbearable.

It was nice to share a brew in person with @hsdrop - well met!

We drove, including breaks, about 9 hours to get there, and after setting everything up, had 30 minutes to relax before the eclipse started. 45 minutes after the totality, we were back on the road - kind of. It was bumper to bumper, in many locations, for much of the first 6 hours, by which time we had managed to make 90 miles of progress. It took us 17 hours to get home from the event. If I had it to do over, I would have rented the motel for two nights, and just holed up, and waited for traffic to clear.

Still we had a great event, and arrived home safely, so I don't have any complaints.
 
Last edited:

Dr Transport

Science Advisor
Gold Member
2,199
365
upload_2017-8-22_19-9-11.png


Time lapse from near St Clair Missouri
upload_2017-8-22_19-9-23.png

The assembled motley crew, DrT is the one on the left in the tie-dye

upload_2017-8-22_19-9-43.png


During totality, from my friends GoPro......
 
752
562
I think the diamond ring is what is shown in image 2 of post #137.
You mean the video? Yes it shows twice a diamond ring there. Also see posts #357, #367 (more recenty). [My favourite is #367 ... (but 357 clearer image and pretty good too!)]
I think the fire storms are what my neighbor caught in this shot below. I love the colors, but I can't decide if they are pink or orange. I also don't know which side is up in this image.
You're probably right that most likely he meant those. I was also confused about direction and orientation. Aren't those "pink/orange fire storms" due to sun's light escaping through the craters of the moon? Since the moon is not a perfect round! ... That's what NASA said. In any case they don't seem to be flares ...
 
Last edited:

scottdave

Science Advisor
Homework Helper
Insights Author
Gold Member
1,569
579
In Houston it was about 67% eclipsed. My attempt at a pinhole viewer made a tiny projection of the eclipse. I remembered seeing about using a telescope to project the image. I happened to have some 10x50 binoculars, and was able to make a larger projection.

vIgG7BU.jpg
 

scottdave

Science Advisor
Homework Helper
Insights Author
Gold Member
1,569
579
My wife had to stay behind in northern VA but she had glasses with her. I didn't expect her to get any decent pictures but she is pretty resourceful. Who needs solar filters when you have just the right amount of water for a filter?
I agree. Great pic. I was unable to acquire any glasses (for a reasonable price). I was fooling around trying to get the pinhole viewer, and then it started to get darker. I looked up and saw something nearly similar, through the clouds. It was beautiful, but I knew I should not stare at that, even through clouds. By the time I got my camera ready, it was completely behind the cloud. A friend took several shots with a nice camera. I haven't heard if any turned out worth sharing, though.
 
Last edited:
752
562
What was that "vehicle" passing in front of the competing Sun and Moon? Did anyone get that guy's licence plates number?
I did! "ISS 2017" ...

Note: This is a real video, originally broadcasted in NASA's live streaming. (I saw it while playing)
Here is an alternative video, with the proper description this time.
It happened in Banner Wyoming !
 

jim hardy

Science Advisor
Gold Member
2018 Award
9,795
4,804
Welder's helmet worked very well but it was hot inside it. I sunburn in just a few minutes so it saved me from that. Two #10's made the sun plenty dark .
Welding lenses are not particularly flat , rather wavy like 19th century windowpanes. Photographs through them come out just awful. But without magnification they give a good image to the eye.
For an instant right at beginning of totality i saw what i believe had to be that orange flare on right hand side of the sun. Of course to naked eye it was tiny.


Enjoyed meeting Mr & Mrs @anorlunda . Great afternoon, found eclipse chasers to be a friendly lot. Had nice chats with folks from as far as Texas and Ontario right there in Land Between the Lakes park. Next time i think i too will camp - the traffic afterward was dreadful.

Fair Anne and I got ready in such a rush we forgot the camera. This being our first eclipse, i now know that i want a solar filter and camera attachment for a small telescope. Picked up a Meade ETX70 at a yard sale a week or so ago , have yet to get familiar with it. Seems about the right flavor...


old jim
 

OCR

738
580
As the sunlight dwindled near totality, shadows became sharper.
We were on the edge of the track, so no totality here, but my wife said the same thing about the shadows... she said "it got a lot cooler", too.
 

Borg

Science Advisor
Gold Member
1,818
2,029
In Houston it was about 67% eclipsed. My attempt at a pinhole viewer made a tiny projection of the eclipse. I remembered seeing about using a telescope to project the image. I happened to have some 10x50 binoculars, and was able to make a larger projection.

View attachment 209548
Same here. My pinhole camera was a waste of time. It worked but the image was tiny and dim. My host mounted a pair of binoculars on a tripod and got excellent results like yours.
 

davenn

Science Advisor
Gold Member
8,615
5,478
I think the diamond ring is what is shown in image 2 of post #137. I think the fire storms are what my neighbor caught in this shot below. I love the colors, but I can't decide if they are pink or orange. I also don't know which side is up in this image. I also feel sorry for my neighbor, he concentrated so much getting these max zoomed images that he never saw the corona.

several nice prominences in that pic your neighbour took .... he can be well pleased with the result

@Borg caught the diamond ring effect very well on post #367


Dave
 

Borg

Science Advisor
Gold Member
1,818
2,029
During totality, from my friends GoPro......
I haven't gotten a copy of the video yet but there was a GoPro running at my site also. From what I've seen on that and the posts here, they are great for set-and-forget event capture. I may have to invest in one before the next eclipse. :oldsmile:
 

OmCheeto

Gold Member
2,023
2,366
[edit] Maybe youtube works better.....


[/edit]



0:00 king sized white bed sheet [no shadow bands :oldgrumpy:]
0:52 things got dark really fast
0:56 first "Woo!"
0:57 first "Woo Hoo!"
1:03 first "Wow"
1:10 peak of screams
1:17 switched from sheet to eclipse
1:29 "attempt" at spectral experiment
1:39 end of spectral experiment. lens fell off. suppressed swearing.
1:44 young voice from the crowd; "there are the coyotes" [see below]
1:55 first sight of Regulus
2:26 stopped fiddling with camera. sat back, and watched.
3:12 end of totality
3:13 lost Regulus
3:27 started capturing partial via "lens interaction(?)"
3:43 looking at it now, it looks like it was kind of cloudy
3:45 2nd attempt at spectral imaging
3:50 my camera was obviously quite confused
3:54 my; "I'm going to fiddle with things, in case my camera gets confused" idea clicked in
4:08 realized I might be destroying my camera
4:14 evidence that Oregonians do not like crowded spaces
4:43 evidence that I had a spare camera going
4:51 last chance at "shadow bands". Poop!
5:16 pan to "serious" people
5:21 zoom to "serious" people being inundated with people interested in science
5:53 Om lets out a sigh, thinking to himself; "Thank god, I didn't die". I'm sure his is blood pressure was off the charts, as blood was squirting from a few mosquito bite sites, before, during, and after the event.

[below]
I do not recommend camping at the Mountain Creek Ranch, in Mitchell Oregon, unless you have an RV. The temperature last night was 28°F. Also, the coyotes start howling around midnight, and don't stop until about a half hour before dawn. I think there are about 50,000 that live on the ranch. So bring earplugs.

ps. I am officially, no longer a "city slicker", as, my tent now smells like cow poop.

[/below]
 
Last edited:

Want to reply to this thread?

"U.S. Solar Eclipse of Aug. 21, 2017" You must log in or register to reply here.

Physics Forums Values

We Value Quality
• Topics based on mainstream science
• Proper English grammar and spelling
We Value Civility
• Positive and compassionate attitudes
• Patience while debating
We Value Productivity
• Disciplined to remain on-topic
• Recognition of own weaknesses
• Solo and co-op problem solving
Top