"Unfortunately, You are not the right fit at this time"

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In summary, the company is seeking candidates with specialized experience, and is not open to candidates with backgrounds in physics. They are open to candidates with teaching and tutoring experience, but are not interested in candidates with physics backgrounds.
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Hercuflea
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I've been getting this as almost a robotic response from every company I've applied to lately. "Unfortunately, You are not the right fit at this time, and we are considering other candidates...blah blah." I'm starting to think it's because my experience isn't specialized enough? I have an MS in Physics where I did a thesis using python and XML to run some turbulence simulations. It doesn't seem to really fit the job description anywhere I apply. What can I do to be a "better fit"? At what time??
 
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  • #2
I have a question for you. What kinds of positions are you applying to? Without having a better idea of what kinds of jobs you are looking for, it is difficult to determine how you can be a "better fit" (i.e. be a potential candidate for a given job).
 
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I should also add that in my Conversation (i.e. PM) to you, I gave you some specific tips on gaining relevant knowledge to enter specific fields. I'm willing to follow up with you in more detail again.
 
  • #4
I've applied to anything I see that somewhat corresponds to my background. Programming, data science, engineering positions, defense companies, aerospace, admin, IT, teaching and tutoring, Spanish interpreter... The only thing that's given a positive response are teaching and tutoring, but I don't want to do that unless its my last resort because it will not give me any valuable work experience. Sent you a PM.
 
  • #5
Hercuflea said:
I've been getting this as almost a robotic response from every company I've applied to lately. "Unfortunately, You are not the right fit at this time, and we are considering other candidates...blah blah." I'm starting to think it's because my experience isn't specialized enough? I have an MS in Physics where I did a thesis using python and XML to run some turbulence simulations. It doesn't seem to really fit the job description anywhere I apply. What can I do to be a "better fit"? At what time??
Have you tried politely asking the interviewer "If you can, what specifically is the "fit" this position is seeking?" It won't help THIS interview, but might provide you with insight into what "hidden" aspects the company is seeking, and thus (possibly) aid you with future applications?
 
  • #6
Old Tele man said:
Have you tried politely asking the interviewer "If you can, what specifically is the "fit" this position is seeking?" It won't help THIS interview, but might provide you with insight into what "hidden" aspects the company is seeking, and thus (possibly) aid you with future applications?

This advice would only be helpful if one has actually had a face-to-face interview, and then had been turned down the position. It would not surprise me if in many instances, the rejection would be sent out as an automated e-mail.
 
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True, when the company is NOT truly looking for candidates but rather merely "meeting Federal/State Hiring Requirements" by posting the position (which, unfortunately happens WAY too often).

My point was: turn each interview opportunity into a concurrent "information gathering" opportunity, something to provide you with better insight into being "better" considered at the NEXT interview, by being able to tailor your responses to align more with what the *company* seeks and less with what *you* think they want.
 
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  • #8
In case you are interviewing for a position which you believe is at least a "good" fit, if not exactly the "right" fit, explain to the interviewer HOW you fit, and be as specific as possible.
 

1. Why was I told that I am not the right fit at this time?

Employers often consider a variety of factors when making hiring decisions, including qualifications, experience, and fit with the company culture. While you may have met some of the requirements for the position, there may have been other candidates who were a better fit for the role.

2. Can I ask for feedback on why I was not chosen?

Yes, it is always appropriate to ask for feedback after a job application or interview. Politely request feedback from the employer, and be open to constructive criticism that can help you improve for future opportunities.

3. Is there anything I can do to change the outcome?

Unfortunately, the hiring decision has already been made and it is unlikely that you can change the outcome. However, you can continue to improve your skills and qualifications for future job opportunities.

4. Will I be considered for future positions with the same company?

It is possible that you may be considered for future positions with the company, especially if you were a strong candidate for the role. However, it is also important to continue to apply to other opportunities and not solely rely on one company for future job prospects.

5. How can I handle this rejection in a professional manner?

Firstly, it is important to thank the employer for considering you for the position and for providing you with the feedback. Express your disappointment in a professional and respectful manner, and continue to maintain a positive relationship with the company for potential future opportunities.

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