Unfurling the string dimensions

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According to string theory there are an extra 7 spatial dimensions curled up at every point in space. They are so small(Planck length) that nothing can move through them and are completely undetectable. My question is this:
Does string theory allow for these dimensions to uncurl and become large enough to detect directly? In other words, is it physically possible for these tiny dimensions to become bigger, as big as our normal three dimensions? And if they did, what would our world be like?
 

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Chronos
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bapowell
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According to string theory there are an extra 7 spatial dimensions curled up at every point in space. They are so small(Planck length) that nothing can move through them and are completely undetectable. My question is this:
Does string theory allow for these dimensions to uncurl and become large enough to detect directly? In other words, is it physically possible for these tiny dimensions to become bigger, as big as our normal three dimensions? And if they did, what would our world be like?
Sure. With the advent of the Randal-Sundrum models, theorists began considering large-ish (even infinite) extra dimensions with strongly warped geometries. The sizes of the extra dimensions in general are controlled by certain dynamical degrees of freedom in string theory. The fixing of the size of the dimensions -- known as moduli stabilization -- has been an active area of research.
 

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