Uni for undergrad physics - does it matter which?

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  • #1
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The first one seems more industry focused whilst the second focuses on research. Here are the course outlines:

1
Sem 1 - Physics
Sem 2 - Calculus 1, Mechanics, Electromagnetism and Thermodynamics
Sem 3 - Calculus 2, Materials and Thermal Physics, Optics and Radiation Physics
Sem 4 - Mathematics for Physicists, Electromagnetics and Quantum Physics
Sem 5 - Quantum and Statistical Physics, Applied Physics
Sem 6 - Photonics and Nuclear Physics, Solid State Physics

Pros: Convenient (transport + already been there for a couple of years), more likely to have a job in science when I graduate
Cons: I'm not sure if you can minor in math because it's a different dept, the course seems pretty half-***ed

2
Sem 1 - Physics 1, Calculus 2*
Sem 2 - Physics 2, Linear Algebra
Sem 3 - Quantum Mechanics and Special Relativity, Thermal and Classical Physics, Vector Calculus
Sem 4 - Electromagnetism and Optics, Real Analysis with Applications
Sem 5 - Quantum Physics, Electrodynamics, Complex Analysis
Sem 6 - Statistical Physics, Physics Lab A

* or Calculus 1 depending on your HSC score

Pros: research focused
Cons: Not as close to as I'd like, hey require you to take one extra subject which isn't related to your course, so nothing science-related (IMO, a waste of time)


Assuming I do well, I intend on pursuing a Master's after I graduate at the second Uni (or interstate) and later down the track, maybe a PhD as I'm interested in doing research

So basically, does it matter which of the two I go to for my undergraduate degree?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
fss
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Why are you "more likely to have a job in science when [you] graduate" for #1?
 
  • #3
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Out curiosity, which universities are these? Where are you from? I ask because you mentioned the HSC.
 
  • #4
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Physics without a linear algebra course seems iffy to me, industry-focused or otherwise. For that matter, so does physics without differential equations, though that may vary a little more. Granted, if you can do that minor in math that won't be a problem. 2 does appear more legit to me because it locks in that mathematics background in the program, although it'll likely be part of the prereqs for #1 anyway. On that grounds, and on the grounds that #2 includes a lab aspect, I would prefer #2, but you'll have to clear that part about the maths up.
 
  • #5
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Physics without a linear algebra course seems iffy to me, industry-focused or otherwise. For that matter, so does physics without differential equations, though that may vary a little more.
(Canadian, so take what I say with a grain of salt)

Some universities teach the mathematics required for physics in the physics courses, while others require (or encourage) you to take the specific mathematics courses.

For example, my (relatively) small university doesn't even offer a specific course in partial differential equations, but there's mathematical physics courses that cover them extensively.
 

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