Universal gravitational word problem test tomorrow

In summary: So r=79 million meters. g= Gm/r^2 =(1.0 x 10^6)(3.45 x 10^26) / (79 x 10^6)^2= 3.69 N/kgThis is the strength of the gravitational field at an orbit of 1.0 x 10^6 m above the planet Zoklopgniald. In summary, the strength of the gravitational field at an orbit of 1.0 x 10^6 m above the planet Zoklopgniald is 3.69 N/kg.
  • #1
max1020
45
0
1. What is the strength of the gravitational field (in N/kg) at an orbit of 1.0 x106 m above the planet Zoklopgniald with mass of 3.45 x1026 kg and mean radius of 7.80 x107m? ANS:3.69 N/kg What is the gravitational force exerted on a 2840 kg satellite orbiting Zoklopgniald at this altitude? ANS:10 500 N

2. What is the force of gravity between two electrons (mass = 9.11 x 10-31 kg) that are 1.0 m apart? ANS: 5.54 x 10-71 N


I HAVE NO IDEA HOW TO DO THIS! i tried using the two formulas for universal gravitation but my answers are soo off! and our teacher said the questions are kind of similar to this review package. can someone walk me through these! thank you :):confused:
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
g=Gm/r^2
used this formula
 
  • #3
g= Gm/r^2

=(1.0 x 10^6)(3.45 x 10^26) / (7.80 x 10^7)^2
this is what i did for question 1 of the 1st part
 
  • #4
max1020 said:
g=Gm/r^2
used this formula

For the first part of question 1, this is the correct formula.

m=mass of the planet

r=distance from the center of the planetEdit:
max1020 said:
g= Gm/r^2

=(1.0 x 10^6)(3.45 x 10^26) / (7.80 x 10^7)^2
this is what i did for question 1 of the 1st part

G is a constant (I think it's called "the universal constant of gravity" or something)
You might want to google the value of G for this problem.

You used
r = 7.80 x 10^7 = the radius of the planet

Is the radius of the planet equal to the distance of the satellite to the center of the planet?
 
  • #5
are my substitutions correct because i caluculated by answer and it wasn't the same as 3.69 N/kg
 
  • #6
max1020 said:
are my substitutions correct because i caluculated by answer and it wasn't the same as 3.69 N/kg

I edited my last post.
 
  • #7
so would the radius be 2840
 
  • #8
max1020 said:
so would the radius be 2840

No how did you get that? The problem says that the distance from the center to the surface of the planet (the radius) is 78 million meters. It also says that the satellite is 1 million meters above the surface of the planet.

So how far is the satellite from the center of the planet?

That is what you use for "r"
 
  • #9
1 million metres above the surface
 
  • #10
max1020 said:
1 million metres above the surface

That is the distance from the satellite to the surface of the planet.

That is not the distance from the satellite to the center of the planet.

It will help if you draw a picture.
 
  • #11
so is it like 78million-1million=77million
 
  • #12
max1020 said:
so is it like 78million-1million=77million
How did you get that answer?

Sorry if I sound rude but it seems like you are guessing. In physics, you should be able to explain each step you take.
So what makes you think it is 77 million? Maybe that's right, but what makes you think it's right?I really encourage you to draw a picture of the situation.
 
  • #13
i don't really know how to draw the picture because i don't get the question properly
 
  • #14
max1020 said:
i don't really know how to draw the picture because i don't get the question properly

This is what the problem says:

You have a planet of a certain radius (it's approximately a sphere) with a satellite that is a certain height above the surface. What is the gravitational acceleration (a.k.a. "gravitational field strength") of the satellite?

Can you draw a picture of that now? Is anything unclear? (It really helps if you can tell me what is unclear)So do you know what the variables "M" and "r" represent in the equation that you posted? ([itex]G\frac{M}{r^2}[/itex])
 
  • #15
m=mass which is 3.45 x 10^26 but i don't get how you find the radius because i thought it was 7.80 x 10^7? can u show how you find the radius
 
  • #16
max1020 said:
m=mass which is 3.45 x 10^26 but i don't get how you find the radius because i thought it was 7.80 x 10^7? can u show how you find the radius

That is the radius, of the planet.

But in the equation you posted you do not use the radius of the planet for "r"

"r" is the distance from the center of the planet to the satellite.
 
  • #17
i did g= Gm/r^2
 
  • #18
max1020 said:
i did g= Gm/r^2

What is r?
 
  • #19
7.80 x 10^7
 
  • #20
max1020 said:
7.80 x 10^7

That is the r of an object on the surface of the planet. That is not the r of an object 1million meters above the surface of the planet.


I'm sorry but I just don't know how else to put it.
 
  • #21
how do i find the r of the satellite? is there an formula
 
  • #22
If you draw a picture it will be clear.

The distance from the center to the surface is 78 million.

The distance from the surface to the satellite is 1 million.

Therefore the distance from the center to the satellite is 79 million.
 

Related to Universal gravitational word problem test tomorrow

1. How does gravity affect objects in the universe?

Gravity is a fundamental force that attracts objects with mass towards each other. This means that all objects in the universe, no matter how large or small, are affected by gravity.

2. What is the equation for calculating gravitational force?

The equation for calculating gravitational force is F = G * (m1 * m2)/r^2, where F is the force of gravity, G is the universal gravitational constant, m1 and m2 are the masses of the two objects, and r is the distance between them.

3. How is the universal gravitational constant determined?

The universal gravitational constant, G, is determined through experiments and observations. It is a fundamental constant in the laws of gravity and is used to calculate the force of gravity between two objects.

4. What is a word problem involving universal gravitation?

A common word problem involving universal gravitation is calculating the gravitational force between two objects, given their masses and the distance between them. This can be used to understand how gravity affects objects in the universe, such as planets orbiting around a star.

5. How can I prepare for a test on universal gravitation?

To prepare for a test on universal gravitation, it is important to review the equations and concepts related to gravity, such as the equation for calculating gravitational force and the effects of mass and distance on gravity. It may also be helpful to practice solving word problems involving universal gravitation.

Similar threads

Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
3K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
6
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
8
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
18
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
23
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
812
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
1K
Back
Top