1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Using F=kvx in order to describe x as a function of t

  1. Oct 2, 2011 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    The force acting on a particle of mass m is given by
    F=kvx
    in which k is a positive constant. The particle passes through the origin with the speed v naught at time t=0. Find x as a function of (t)


    2. Relevant equations
    F=ma
    a=(dx/dt)(dv/dx)



    3. The attempt at a solution
    F=kvx

    ma=kvx

    a=kvx/m

    (dx/dt)(dv/dx)=kvx/m

    v(dv/dx)=kvx/m

    dv/dx=kx/m

    dv=(kx/m)dx

    integral of both sides left in terms of dv and right in terms of dx

    V-Vnaught=kx^2/2m

    I'm not sure where to go from here. Help would be very much appreciated!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 2, 2011 #2
    Nevermind I figured it out. For anyone who's curious.

    V=(kx^2/2m)+Vnaught
    dx/dt=(kx^2/2m)+Vnaught
    dx/((kx^2/2m)+Vnaught)=dt
    then integrate both sides.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Using F=kvx in order to describe x as a function of t
  1. Given a function f(x) (Replies: 3)

  2. F(x,v) = kvx (Replies: 5)

Loading...