Variables This should be easy -- Matched units on LHS & RHS?

In summary: You have to show your work, as in, you have to show the equations you used to arrive at the answer.In summary, the variables and their units are x (meters), v (meters per second), t (seconds), and a (meters per second squared). The equations are as follows:(a) x = vt Yes - the units on the left side (m) match the units on the right side (m/s * s).(b) x = vt + 1/2 at^2 Yes - the units on the left side (m) match the units on the right side (m/s * s + 1/2 * m/s^2 * s^2 = m).(c
  • #1
kng1994
2
0
Variable Units
x Meters (m)
v Meters per second (m/s)
t seconds (s)
a Meters per second squared (m/s^2) These variables appear in the following equations, along with a few numbers that have no units. In which of the equations are the units on the left side of the equals sign consistent with the units on the right side?
(a) x = vt
Yes or No?

(b) x = vt + 1/2 at^2
Yes or No?

(c) v = at
Yes or No?

(d) v = at + 1/2 at^3
Yes or No?

(e) v^3 = 2ax^2
Yes or No?

(f) t = square root(2x/a)
Yes or No?" itemprop="text">The following table lists four variables along with their units. Variable Units
x Meters (m)
v Meters per second (m/s)
t seconds (s)
a Meters per second squared (m/s^2) These variables appear in the following equations, along with a few numbers that have no units. In which of the equations are the units on the left side of the equals sign consistent with the units on the right side?
(a) x = vt
Yes or No?

(b) x = vt + 1/2 at^2
Yes or No?

(c) v = at
Yes or No?

(d) v = at + 1/2 at^3
Yes or No?

(e) v^3 = 2ax^2
Yes or No?

(f) t = square root(2x/a)
Yes or No?

A B C F are all yes's right and D and E are no's right? If this is correct can someone try walking me through how to show my work for my answer. I can just see with my eyes what is going to work with past experiences but no way to actually describe why.
 
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  • #2
Try replacing all the variables with the units associated with it, then carry out the operations. For the first one:
x=vt
m=(m/s)*s
Does that work out?
 
  • #3
Also, yes.
 
  • #4
kng1994, you have to use the homework template when posting a homework question and you absolutely have to write an attempt at a solution.
 
  • #5
DrClaude said:
kng1994, you have to use the homework template when posting a homework question and you absolutely have to write an attempt at a solution.
Seconded. I was tired last night and not paying attention, otherwise I would have (presumably) mentioned that.
While you have answers, those answers are not work.
 

What are variables and why are they important in scientific research?

Variables are factors that can be changed or controlled in an experiment. They are important in scientific research because they allow scientists to test specific hypotheses and determine cause-and-effect relationships.

What is the difference between independent and dependent variables?

Independent variables are manipulated or controlled by the researcher in an experiment, while dependent variables are the outcome or result that is being measured. Independent variables cause changes in the dependent variable.

Why is it important to have matched units on both sides of an equation when dealing with variables?

Having matched units on both sides of an equation ensures that the equation is balanced and that the results are accurate. It also allows for easier comparison and analysis of the data.

Can variables be both categorical and continuous?

Yes, variables can be both categorical and continuous. Categorical variables are qualitative and have distinct categories or groups, while continuous variables are numerical and can take on any value within a range.

How can researchers control for confounding variables in an experiment?

Researchers can control for confounding variables by randomly assigning participants to different groups, using blinding techniques, and conducting statistical analyses to account for any potential confounding variables. They can also conduct a pilot study to identify and control for any potential confounders before conducting the actual experiment.

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