Varying laws of high energy physics in inflation?

In summary, the conversation discusses Albrecht's paper on "clock ambiguity" and the possibility of different fundamental laws of physics. Albrecht suggests that quantum cosmology may lead to the consideration of different high energy physics models as equally valid alternatives, which could have implications for inflation. He cites Linde's papers on this topic, one of which discusses the idea that different universes or domains may have different fundamental laws of physics. However, it is argued that this is not a valid distinction and that the laws of physics only lead to different behaviors in different energy regimes.
  • #1
Suekdccia
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TL;DR Summary
Could different laws of high energy physics take place in cosmological inflationary models?
I am have some questions that have arisen while reading an old but interesting article by Andreas Albrecht [1] that cites an article by Andrei Linde in the 90s on cosmic inflation [2]...Albrecht's paper is related to his ideas on "clock ambiguity" in which he proposes that the laws of physics (even the most fundamental ones) could have been different. On page 9-10, he says: "Many different effective GUT scale theories could account for our observations of the physical world. If quantum cosmology actually forces us to consider a range of high energy physics models as equally realistic alternatives (as I argued in Sect. 2) then the implications for inflation could be very interesting" So he cites a couple of Linde papers related to this topic, one of them being [2]. I am reading it and I have some important doubts: 1. I have always read that in inflationary models dealing with multiple universes, they would have different physical laws at low energies (low-energy laws of physics) but from what Albrecht says in his paper, could it also be possible that they could have different fundamental high energy laws of physics?* Does the paper of Linde [2] deal with this topic, as Albrecht seems to indicate when citing it? 2. If so, what conditions would have to be met for this to be possible? What would there have to be in the universe for it to be possible?

Of course since we cannot experimentally prove which inflationary model is right, if any, I am asking this question from a theoretical point of view

[1]: https://arxiv.org/abs/gr-qc/9408023

[2]: https://arxiv.org/abs/gr-qc/9306035

*I found another article by Linde (https://arxiv.org/abs/hep-th/0211048) where he suggests that in inflation theory one may consider that different universes or domains may have different fundamental laws of physics (see section 6, especially towards the end)
 
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  • #2
Suekdccia said:
I have always read
Where? Please give some references.
 
  • #3
Suekdccia said:
in inflationary models dealing with multiple universes, they would have different physical laws at low energies (low-energy laws of physics) but from what Albrecht says in his paper, could it also be possible that they could have different fundamental high energy laws of physics?
I don't think the distinction you are making here is valid. Our current universe does not have "high energy laws of physics" and "low energy laws of physics". It just has laws of physics. What the papers you reference are describing as "high energy" and "low energy" laws are really just what kinds of behavior the single set of laws in our universe lead to for the different energy regimes.

For example, the Standard Model predicts that, above the electroweak symmetry breaking energy, the underlying masslessness of all of the Standard Model particles is manifest, whereas below the electroweak symmetry breaking energy, electroweak symmetry breaking makes most of the Standard Model fields behave as if they have nonzero rest mass due to interaction with the Higgs field. This is not two different sets of physical laws; it is just how the same set of physical laws lead to different behavior in different energy regimes. It's no different from a piece of ferromagnetic material having zero magnetization above the critical temperature but nonzero magnetization below the critical temperature (an example used in the first paper you reference). The laws of physics governing ferromagnetism don't change with temperature; only the observed behavior the laws lead to does.
 
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  • #4
Suekdccia said:
in inflation theory one may consider that different universes or domains may have different fundamental laws of physics
Per my previous post, I think this is really a misnomer. What Linde is actually describing is that a particular set of laws--basically the laws of an "eternal inflation" model--have multiple possible solutions, and those solutions correspond to different "universes" with different behaviors. This would mean that what we currently consider to be "the physical laws" of our universe are not actually laws, they are one particular solution of the actual laws (the "eternal inflation" laws Linde is describing).
 
  • #5
Suekdccia said:
Albrecht's paper is related to his ideas on "clock ambiguity" in which he proposes that the laws of physics (even the most fundamental ones) could have been different. On page 9-10, he says: "Many different effective GUT scale theories could account for our observations of the physical world. If quantum cosmology actually forces us to consider a range of high energy physics models as equally realistic alternatives (as I argued in Sect. 2) then the implications for inflation could be very interesting" So he cites a couple of Linde papers related to this topic, one of them being [2]. I am reading it and I have some important doubts: 1. I have always read that in inflationary models dealing with multiple universes, they would have different physical laws at low energies (low-energy laws of physics) but from what Albrecht says in his paper, could it also be possible that they could have different fundamental high energy laws of physics?* Does the paper of Linde [2] deal with this topic, as Albrecht seems to indicate when citing it?
What I believe he was trying to illustrate here is the difficulty in extrapolating from our observations to a theory of everything. He's saying, in effect, that you can take the exact same set of observations and match either Theory of Everything A with clock X, or instead match Theory of Everything B with clock Y. The A/X pair looks completely identical to the B/Y pair. So you could never, even in principle, distinguish between theories A and B.

The rest of the paper is an attempt to move forward despite this ambiguity.

So it's not really about varying laws of physics. It's about the difficulties in determining which proposed laws of physics are more or less likely to be true, in effect by limiting the range of inquiry to a range of cases where there is no such ambiguity.
 
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Related to Varying laws of high energy physics in inflation?

What is inflation in high energy physics?

Inflation in high energy physics refers to a theoretical period of rapid expansion in the early universe, where the universe grew exponentially in a fraction of a second. This concept is used to explain the observed uniformity and flatness of the universe.

What are the varying laws of high energy physics in inflation?

The varying laws of high energy physics in inflation refer to the idea that during the period of inflation, the laws of physics were different than they are now. This is based on the theory of cosmic inflation, which suggests that the universe underwent a phase transition during inflation, resulting in a change in the fundamental laws of physics.

How do varying laws of high energy physics in inflation affect our understanding of the universe?

The concept of varying laws of high energy physics in inflation has significant implications for our understanding of the universe. It suggests that the laws of physics we observe today may not have been the same in the early universe, and that there may be fundamental laws or principles that we have yet to discover.

What evidence supports the idea of varying laws of high energy physics in inflation?

One of the main pieces of evidence for varying laws of high energy physics in inflation is the observed uniformity and flatness of the universe. This is difficult to explain without some form of inflation, which suggests that the laws of physics were different in the early universe. Additionally, observations of the cosmic microwave background radiation also support the idea of inflation and varying laws of high energy physics.

How does the concept of varying laws of high energy physics in inflation relate to other theories in physics?

The concept of varying laws of high energy physics in inflation is closely related to other theories in physics, such as the theory of cosmic inflation and string theory. It also has implications for our understanding of the fundamental forces and particles in the universe, as well as the origin of the universe and the concept of a multiverse.

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