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Want to invent something really useful?

  1. Jan 10, 2012 #1

    turbo

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    I have a 400-CD carousel, and there are some songs that I have to hit "next" on every time. I have a couple of hundred other CDs, but the ones that are in the carousel are probably the best (at least some songs).

    Music-lovers in this century can pick and choose which songs that they will listen to, but I actually like "album-cuts" and will gladly listen to them. I am a dinosaur (I still have 300-400 albums) but I'd really like a way to un-friend some songs on my carousel CD player.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 10, 2012 #2
    You do know its 2012 right? Get an mp3 player.
     
  4. Jan 10, 2012 #3
    That's about 300gb of data you can store on a hard drive as mp3s and shuffle any way you want.
     
  5. Jan 10, 2012 #4

    AlephZero

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    If you want a "technophobe" solution you could get one of these: http://www.brennan.co.uk/

    But I don't really see the advantage over any other sort of mp3 player.
     
  6. Jan 10, 2012 #5

    dlgoff

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    I'm thinking turbo doesn't want any reduction in quality.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MP3#Audio_quality
     
  7. Jan 10, 2012 #6

    turbo

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    True. I'd love to stay with albums if possible.
     
  8. Jan 10, 2012 #7

    Ivan Seeking

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    Let me guess, you prefer tube amps to solid state?
     
  9. Jan 10, 2012 #8

    Moonbear

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    You can save them in other formats that aren't as lossy, but it comes at the expense of file size. Still, if you copy the songs in any format, you can delete any you don't like, or set a player to skip them, or play them less frequently.

    Personally, I can't hear the differences audiophiles claim to hear, so I'm happy to buy mp3s as single songs rather than entire albums since I usually only like few songs on an album.
     
  10. Jan 10, 2012 #9

    dlgoff

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    Well yea. But turbo is an audiophile.
     
  11. Jan 10, 2012 #10

    turbo

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    As a musician, I can't bear to play guitar through to a solid-state amp. I have three amps, two of which are Fender Vibro-Champs that (combined) are older than anybody here.

    I'm pretty picky about amplification and speakers. I'm not some nut that wants to spend $$$$$$$$ on a twee tube amp for my stereo, but I have thought long and hard about building a low-watt stereo tube amp.
     
  12. Jan 10, 2012 #11
    It doesn't really matter though. The lossless formats are indistinguishable from their physical counterparts. Of course some people claim they can tell, but I remember seeing a few blinds studies showing that no one can - even dedicated audiophiles.
     
  13. Jan 10, 2012 #12

    Moonbear

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    CDs are already a digital format so no reason to expect any difference. I can understand an argument that vinyl sounds different, because it does, though it's personal preference if that's better or worse. I don't hear it myself, but can appreciate some could hear a difference with different speaker types too. But there shouldn't be any difference between a CD and file of it saved in lossless format.
     
  14. Jan 10, 2012 #13

    OmCheeto

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    lossless format?
     
  15. Jan 10, 2012 #14

    PAllen

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    Also, there are lossless compressed formats that take up a lot less space than the files on the CD (thought still a lot more than mp3). Disks are dirt cheap these days. A not so cheap way to go is that the largest ipod made will store and play about 400 cd's worth of lossless compressed music, allowing all the play freedom you want. Then, there are at least two technologies I know for wireless broadcast of music (any quality) from music server you could set up.
     
  16. Jan 10, 2012 #15
    If you're an audiophile and don't want to lose the sound quality then get a Cowon. They play just about every audio format including FLAC and WAV (the format used for CD's).

    I have the S9 and I can most definitely tell the difference between a FLAC/WAV file and a mp3. If you're listeng from an ipod, then yeah ,you can't tell the difference but a media player with a good amp and ear buds can sometimes be night and day.

    I recommend the iAudio 10 with some Klipsch S4's.
     
  17. Jan 10, 2012 #16

    PAllen

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    I can distinguish mp3 and lossless formats easily. I believe in mathematics, so I believe a truly lossless compression is just that. I have a high quality switch to run an ipod into my main amp (also have vinyl, cds, even reel-reel tapes - you know, dead basement tapes). I don't see detect any difference between lossless files on ipod and the original cd. I also notice plenty of difference between a high quality vinyl record and a cd.
     
  18. Jan 11, 2012 #17
    I have a 300 disk CD changer that I use as well. (I have all of my CDs ripped to my PC/ipod, but when at home my stereo takes over)

    What I have done is create a 'master list' of music CDs that I would want on random. My disk-changer allows for a few groups, so I have a group which consists of nearly every CD (minus some comedy and off-beat stuff that would be wierd mixed in with my classic rock, metal and the like). I thought that I could have an 'exclude' group, but for shuffle to work right it needs to be inclusive. I'm sure this functionality is totally dependant on your type of disk changer.
     
  19. Jan 11, 2012 #18

    Ivan Seeking

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    I have a friend around our age whose father owned a TV repair shop and was also an electronics hobbiest. When dad died, they found boxes and boxes full of old tubes still in the original, unopened boxes. I don't know how many he had but it was in the thousands. Then he discovered that many of those tubes are hard to get and worth a good bit of money. He made a small fortune selling them. IIRC, he had a few that sold for ~ $500 each.

    I asked because I have heard the same complaint about solid state from a number of friends who were or are musicians.

    And remember: Never play an album more than once a day! :biggrin:
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2012
  20. Jan 12, 2012 #19

    jtbell

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    I find that FLAC and Apple Lossless are about 40% to 50% the size of equivalent uncompressed files from CD (AIFF format on my Mac).

    Not quite as cheap right at the moment, thanks to recent floods in Thailand which shut down the factories that make a lot of hard disks. Something that cost about $100 at Best Buy last summer now costs about $150. But this will pass.

    I listen mostly to classical music and have a large enough collection that my wife and I joke about the CD racks that are scattered through three rooms of our house. About a year ago, I realized that I could in principle fit the entire collection (in Apple Lossless format) onto a 2TB hard disk with room to spare. So now my main playback source is iTunes on the Mac in my bedroom, which streams wirelessly to an Apple TV which feeds into the A/V receiver and speakers in the living room. I can select music using the Apple TV's interface on my TV.

    It will take about ten years to rip all my CDs as I listen to them. By that time an even better playback solution will probably come along, but I'll worry about that when it arrives.

    Another factor in making the switch was that several online dealers now sell a fairly large variety of classical-music labels as CD-quality FLAC files. Last year I bought about half of my new music that way, after years of buying only CDs.
     
  21. Jan 12, 2012 #20

    PAllen

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    This is has a lot of overlap with my current strategy (I have a slightly different streaming strategy), except I've finished all the ripping (my cd collection was maller than yours). (Now I'm working on digitizing records with floating point sampling->16 bit wave->flac). Your file size experience is similar to mine (which explains that you can, indeed, fit 400 cd's worth of lossless compressed files on the largest ipod). As for disk prices, admittedly, cheap is relative ... if I spend for a Sumiko Blue cartridge, those disks look cheap.

    I am very interested in the idea of buying FLAC files. I had no idea that was possible - Amazon and Itunes only sell compressed garbage (fine for my daughter ....). Can you give a hint how to find such sources?

    [Edit: did a few searches, found plenty.]
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2012
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