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Calculus What are some good resources for studying Spivak's Calculus?

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  1. Aug 30, 2017 #1
    I'm currently struggling a lot in self-studying Spivak's Calculus; I've tried numerous online resources including math stackexchange, I'm currently about half-way through How To Prove It as many people have suggested. I'm only in high school, so the calculus class I'm taking barely coincides with what Spivak teaches. I've made it to chapter 7 (three hard theorems) so far.

    Does anyone know of any good resources? For example maybe an online lecture course, etc.
    Thanks in advance.

    (PS- This book needs a support group)
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 30, 2017 #2
    Hmm. Maybe reading another less difficult, but good text in conjuction with Spivak? I find Moise: Calculus. To be a great supplement to Spivak.

    If you are struggling with how to read Spivak. Maybe looking at the logic chapters of Discrete Mathemics by Oscar Levin may be useful. The book is available for free online
     
  4. Aug 30, 2017 #3

    jedishrfu

    Staff: Mentor

    Try the video tutorials at: www.mathispower4u.com

    They have three sections for Calculus 1,2, and 3. The videos are 10 min in length and are organized around solving problems.

    Focus on the videos related to the problem you're having trouble (ie don't watch them from the beginning)
     
  5. Sep 5, 2017 #4

    mathwonk

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    why not just try to master the book your class is using? you are rather obviously not ready for spivak's book. so why are you reading a book that does not speak to you? it is not a bragging contest, the point is to read whatever book you are able to understand. calculus is hard. the best preparation is an easier book.
     
  6. Sep 5, 2017 #5
    Sorry if I came across as arrogant or pretentious; I'm not trying to brag. I've already read some other calculus books, and many people told me to acquire this book, but I was unfamiliar with the rigorous nature of the book. I've read through previously what my class is doing.
     
  7. Sep 6, 2017 #6

    mathwonk

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    have you tried apostol's book? i learned a lot also from thomas's book, the early version from the 1950's that is. also courant is a good book. the point is to set aside a book you cannot read and choose one you can. then come back later to the harder one. what book is your class using? looking through a book is not the same as studying it.
     
  8. Sep 6, 2017 #7

    jedishrfu

    Staff: Mentor

  9. Sep 10, 2017 #8
    I've heard of Apostol's book, but I haven't tried it. I'll try to look into it. My class is using this one: https://books.google.com/books?id=P...Hcq0ABwQ6AEIUDAH#v=onepage&q=calculus&f=false
    Thanks for the suggestions
     
  10. Sep 13, 2017 #9

    martinbn

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    Why don't say what you find hard about the book, or give examples of things you struggle with. This way people can help you better than just recommending other books that they guess are easier or helpful, but may not address your problems.
     
  11. Sep 13, 2017 #10

    martinbn

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    I looked in the book, and to be honest it seems perfectly good to self study. I guess you would have to put in the effort. I don't see a reason why you should expect learning calculus to be easy. Especially when it is presented as it should be opposed to textbooks with similar title whose purpose is to teach non maths major students how to solve the basic calculus problems.
     
  12. Sep 13, 2017 #11

    mathwonk

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    well that larson and edwards "book" is the complete antithesis of spivak. it is not a book i would recommend anyone spending any time with who wants to understand the subject. it is for people who have no interest in understanding anything. the leap from that to spivak is huge. there are many much better books than that that are still far easier than spivak. an early edition of edwards and penney for example, or an old edition of thomas from the 1950's. or an early edition of stewart, or maybe just look through my thread on becoming a mathematician, i think there are lots of books suggested there in the first few pages.
     
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