What are the components of force in 3D for a pulled atom?

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In summary, the conversation discusses the effects of applying a force to an atom in a bcc lattice and the components of that force in the x, y, and z directions. While the speaker initially believes that each component would be equal and add to give the force, they later realize that due to symmetry, there will only be movement in the direction in which the force is applied. The conversation also mentions conducting experiments to observe the effects of the force on the other atoms in the lattice.
  • #1
Gogsey
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This not so much of a homework proble, but something I need to visualize and understand to do a homework problem.

If theeres and atom at x,y,z = 0, and one located at x,y,z, = 1/2 and we pull second atom from its posistion with a force F in anyone of the x,y,z directions, what are the components of the force in the x,y and z directions?

I thought that if you pulled it in any of the directiosn, each coponent would be equal and add to give F. So, 1/3 of the force would be in each of the x,y,z directions no matter if you add a force F in x,y, or z.

I have trouble picturing what's happening in 3D.
 
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  • #2
Gogsey said:
and we pull second atom from its posistion with a force F in anyone of the x,y,z directions, what are the components of the force in the x,y and z directions?

Well, the component of force will be F in direction you choose to pull it and 0 in rest directions.

Gogsey said:
I thought that if you pulled it in any of the directiosn, each coponent would be equal and add to give F. So, 1/3 of the force would be in each of the x,y,z directions no matter if you add a force F in x,y, or z.
I really can't understand what you are trying to say
 
  • #3
The picture is a bcc lattice with all the atoms connected to each other.m Now ere onlt consideruing the effects of moving each atom on the centrakl atom. So applying a force in each dimension, and seeing what happens to the atiom in the centre of the cube.

So put a force in the x direction, and see what the restoring force is in x, y and z directions. And we do thies for all 9 atoms including moving the one at the centre of the cude and seeing theeffect on all others.

I guess because of symmetry, there will be zero movement in the y direction, when applyong aforce in the x direction, same for yz and xz combinations. So there should only be a movement in the x direction when there a force along x, and same for yy, and zz.

If we say the atom at the centre is at (0,0,0) and the other ones are are +/-x,+/-y,+/-z, so eight atoms. I was wondering if there woul;d be changes in position to the other atoms in all directions, no matter the direction of the force. But because of symmetry, al lot of these forces will cancel out.
 

1. What are the three components of force in 3D?

The three components of force in 3D are magnitude, direction, and point of application. Magnitude refers to the strength or size of the force, direction refers to the path or line of action of the force, and point of application refers to the location where the force is applied.

2. How can the components of force be calculated?

The components of force can be calculated using trigonometry and vector operations. The magnitude and direction of the force can be determined by breaking down the force into its x, y, and z components and using the Pythagorean theorem and inverse trigonometric functions to find the magnitude and direction.

3. What is the difference between a scalar and a vector quantity?

A scalar quantity has only magnitude and no direction, while a vector quantity has both magnitude and direction. Force is an example of a vector quantity, as it has both magnitude (e.g. 10 Newtons) and direction (e.g. northward).

4. How do the components of force affect an object's motion?

The components of force determine the net force acting on an object, which in turn affects the object's motion. If the net force is zero, the object will remain at rest or continue moving at a constant velocity (Newton's first law). If the net force is not zero, the object will accelerate in the direction of the net force (Newton's second law).

5. Can the components of force change over time?

Yes, the components of force can change over time. This can occur if the magnitude, direction, or point of application of the force changes. For example, if a person pushes a box with a constant force, the magnitude and direction of the force will remain the same, but the point of application will change as the box moves.

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