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What are the main thing I have to take in high school to be a

  1. Feb 27, 2010 #1
    What are the main thing I have to take in high school to be a engineer.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 27, 2010 #2
    Re: Engineer?

    Math,Math,Math,Science,Science,Math, Math,Lunch,Math
     
  4. Feb 27, 2010 #3
    Re: Engineer?

    Which class of math do I need to know?
     
  5. Feb 28, 2010 #4

    chiro

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    Re: Engineer?

    You should do pre-calculus and if calculus is offered at high school I would do it. Most of the math builds on pre-calculus and develops faster than high school is taught.

    In engineering you will build on calculus and do calculus in one variable (both integral and differential) and then do calculus in several variables. You will also do linear algebra.

    On top of the standard calculus streams you will most likely take courses in statistics, differential equations, partial differential equations and possibly numeric analysis. If you don't do these explicitly you will most likely learn applied versions of these on the fly while you deal with solving applied problems.

    The above math progression is typical of an electrical/computer/telecommunications engineer.
    If you do electrical/telecommunication engineering you will probably (definitely for telecommunications) study information theory which is basically applied statistics.

    Don't worry too much about your skill level now. Just make sure you get good marks in Math and do as much math as your high school lets you. Make sure you understand it and try not to simply memorize things like "this method for this problem" but understand why you do what you do and why it works. I say this because when you reach uni, to get decent marks you will typically be doing problems where you have to understand the physics and math in a logical manner and you will have to reason to yourself why you are doing what you are doing. If you can keep a "big picture" view of what you are doing this will help you when you get to uni.

    Hope some of this helps you.
     
  6. Feb 28, 2010 #5

    chiro

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    Re: Engineer?

    I also forgot the sciences: physics and chemistry are required (not chemistry for electrical/computer/telecommunications).
     
  7. Feb 28, 2010 #6
    Re: Engineer?

    You can take anything, but if you want to get into the most prestigious engineering schools make sure you take AP Physics if it is offered (or IB Physics HL), a lot of college also like to see a year of Chemistry (preferably AP Chem if you can). I would also make sure you take Biology, because it is usually a high school requirement. You want 4 years of lab sciences at least.

    As for Math... you want to be in the highest Math class you can be in. Honestly, if you are not THE BEST math student, don't worry just push yourself to the highest class you can plausibly handle (while still learning) and work your *** off. I am not a very good math student, but I pulled my self to the top of my 12th grade AB Calculus class. I have been accepted to Stony Brook (EE), Syracuse (EE), University of Michigan (EE) and am waiting to hear back from RPI (EE), Boston University (EE) and Carnegie Mellon Uni (EE).
     
  8. Mar 3, 2010 #7
    Re: Engineer?

    Also, do I have to learn geometry if I want to become a engineer.
     
  9. Mar 4, 2010 #8
    Re: Engineer?

    I think you have to learn geometry to graduate from high school, but it is a simple version of trigonometry. You definitely need trigonometry and calculus, if you want to be an engineer. Basically, you need every single math class, even statistic.
     
  10. Mar 4, 2010 #9
    Re: Engineer?

    I question the need for lunch here.
     
  11. Mar 5, 2010 #10
    Re: Engineer?

    I agree, do as much math as you can. Then, Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Regarding math, you should also start reading something that prepares you to the abstract way math is done at universities.
     
  12. Mar 5, 2010 #11
    Re: Engineer?

    unless you explicitly want to study something bio related, i think biology (extra) is over-rated. ap chem and ap physics would be my bet (plus math!)

    and maybe a programming course of some kind. but math above all else.
     
  13. Mar 5, 2010 #12
    Re: Engineer?

    Im not good in math, is there another engineering job that is not that much related to math
     
  14. Mar 29, 2010 #13
    Re: Engineer?

    All engineering needs math. You can try for a job that is more hands on than theoretical. Engineering Technician, electronic technician, or other kind of technicians doesn't require as much math as engineering but will pay as much, if you work overtime.
     
  15. Mar 29, 2010 #14
    Re: Engineer?

    :uhh:.........Sales Engineer
     
  16. Mar 29, 2010 #15
    Re: Engineer?

    Well, you can go along the area of environmental engineering. That doesn't sound like an area that utilizes as much math as EE.
     
  17. Mar 29, 2010 #16
    Re: Engineer?

    A great chunk of the things you do in life will require you put effort into them. From being the top janitor to being the President of the US; you won't become the top historian by simply watching the History channel.

    Any kind of engineering (or any career) will demand more knowledge, skills, and experience than what you obtain in high school. I'd say all engineering branches will require a more advanced set of math skills beyond high school. If you really want to be an engineer, or anything in life, start studying and training otherwise you might not get very far.
     
  18. Mar 29, 2010 #17

    danago

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    Re: Engineer?

    I dont study environmental engineering, but from what i gather, it still involves an "above average" level of math. The course at my uni involves the core math units that all engineers study, and i would assume that all of the environmental fluid dynamics and geomechanics type courses would involve a relatively high level of math too.
     
  19. Mar 29, 2010 #18

    jbunniii

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    Re: Engineer?

    You don't get better at math by avoiding it!
     
  20. Apr 1, 2010 #19

    PhanthomJay

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    Re: Engineer?

    That's for sure...if you don't have your mind set to work hard in math and physics, and find some 'enjoyment' in it, then Engineering is not for you. Funny thing, I forget most of what I learned in college in courses like differential equations, advanced calculus, Theory of Elasticity, etc., and have little use of these subjects in my job, but nonetheless, having been exposed to those subjects, and done fairly well with them at the time, is an invaluable asset that must not be underestimated. They are the basis for all engineering.
     
  21. Apr 1, 2010 #20
    Re: Engineer?

    If you aren't good at and don't like math, don't be an engineer. Engineering is mathematics, physics, and chemistry all sprinkled in to one applied science. And just to burst your bubble even more, physics requires proficiency in mathematics as well.

    I'd try something else. I don't know how other schools do it, but at Texas A&M, math is heavily emphasized in chemistry, physics, and engineering. If you're looking for a science that isn't math intensive, try biology.
     
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